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Discussion Starter #1
I have had a Yamaha Z tenor for about 3 years and have had no problems at all.Now suddenly when I switch from the palm key notes or high c or b
(where the octave keys switch)down to g ,the g breaks up.I can even easily blow an overtone d when I hit the g.Could it be something about the octave keys not being in sync.?I live on an Island where there is no tech so any
D.I.Y.instructions would be greatly appreciated.I tried my light and could not see a leak.
 

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if you press down the neck octave key by hand when this happens and it cures it then you need to slightly adjust(bend) the neck octave key up (hold down key on pip and pull out gently little by little and check each time on curved part of key by the octave stem).this will allow the key to close. check this first.
 

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Lamar: I'd closely watch all the mechanisms as I worked the various keys to see if I could spot some unnecessary movement in the octave mechanism. Also look at the forked Bb mechanisms and the G# to see if it is raising any. DAVE
 

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ze solution?

Some other ways to check the octave mechanism

1) Finger low G and "pop" the thumb octave key hard several times and see if the octave pad on the neck jumps. It should not move even a little bit.
2) Still fingering G press down with the thumb key very hard and see if that opens the key on the neck very slightly. It should not.
3) Next remove the neck, and while fingering high G move the small post that contacts the ring on the neck up and down. It should move freely with no friction or hesitation.
4) Check with the neck on the sax that there is about 1/16" gap between that post and the ring of the neck octave.

If you find there is no gap or there was neck key movement on #1 or #2 carefully hold the neck pad down with one hand and with the other hand gently push the ring to bend it away from the body of the neck slightly. Keep bending and checking until you see the 1/16" gap when the neck is inserted to its normal position.

If you felt friction or hesitation of the octave mechanism on #3 look for any keys that look bent. If there are none carefully unscrew the rod holding the octave mechanism keys and remove the keys remembering the order they are in. Clean the inside of the tubes with a soft pipecleaner and clean the rod with a paper towel. Try the rod inside each key independently to see if it rotates easily. If so put a small drop of key oil (not WD40!) inside each key tube and reassemble the octave mechanism. It is easier if you remove the thumb key first, and then reinstall it after the octave mechanism is reattached. If this did not solve the problem or you found bent keys, you should take the sax to a repair tech.

Good luck. I hope this helps.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #6
High D to G etc

I have been examinig & pressing down octave keys as advised.One other thing.From palm key D to G ,G breaks up.D to G# hardly any problem.D to A and up,nothing.So G is the only culprit.
A down to G nothing.Bb to G small effect but B.C.C#,D etc followed by G
G breaks up.
 

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This is interesting. You said you played the sax for 3 years without having this problem and then it started. Have you made any other changes such as mouthpiece, reed strength, amount of practice, doubling on other woodwinds more, etc.? I know that on some tenors even when they are in good adjustment the 2nd harmonic (D) of the fundamental low G is very easy to produce especially when high G is fingered. A Yamaha 875 that came through our shop had this problem. My own silver plated 875 does not do this unless I force the issue by how I play.

Try this experiment. Play high G, hear the pitch, and blow that pitch on an "air whistle" (not a clear whistle but an airstream with that pitch) without the sax. Now play high D with that same feeling in the mouth, throat and airstream and slur to the G. Did it improve when you did this? Sometimes "mentally playing" the 2nd note as you play the first is a workable solution. Keep us posted.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #8
embouchure not so sure

Thank you everyone and JTBSAX I think you hit on something.I.m in my 70.s and my early teachers taught me to roll my lower lip over my bottom teeth as a cushionThe problem,since I started playing again was lower lip fatigue so I changed to a rolled lip embouchure not long ago.I just went back to the old embouchure and applied more pressure and the problem
mostly cleared up.But I can not go back to the old way so I guess I will have to figure out how to build up the side muscles.No one said playing again would be easy but I love it .Does anyone else out there kiss their
saxophones?
 

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I have the same problem (age/lip muscles/teeth). I hope that long tones would solve the problem. 10 minutes a day should do it. The teeth are still a work in progress, so I can't report any successes yet. I am almost sure this is the proper answer. Lip muscles seem to be the first thing to go wrong. Remember- Phil Woods had the same problem and had to adjust/re-configure after he lost teeth. We are not alone. The problem is solvable. I hope I can still get by with the same reed/mouthpiece combination, but am told that might also have to change. Seems logical. Good luck to you.
Hans
 
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