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Maybe this is a tech question, but are there general tendencies as far as the '62s and intonation for certain notes.

I'm working on trying to play more in tune throughout the horn and noticing most everything is spot-on until I get to the palm keys. High D, E, F tend to play quite sharp (while some of this may be embouchure, I'm talking 25-30 cents at times).

If I play altissimo A or some of the other notes, not so much. I've been playing around with not opening some of the vents quite so much, and it does make a lot of difference (wondering if high-F is venting a little too open, not sure how I could test that).

Shawn
 

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Maybe this is a tech question, but are there general tendencies as far as the '62s and intonation for certain notes.

I'm working on trying to play more in tune throughout the horn and noticing most everything is spot-on until I get to the palm keys. High D, E, F tend to play quite sharp (while some of this may be embouchure, I'm talking 25-30 cents at times).

If I play altissimo A or some of the other notes, not so much. I've been playing around with not opening some of the vents quite so much, and it does make a lot of difference (wondering if high-F is venting a little too open, not sure how I could test that).

Shawn
I've found these notes sharp on any alto. The Yamaha 62 is as in tune as any other alto. You can close the right key stack or finger high E and F without the palm D key or bring down the pitch by relaxing your throat and embouchure. These notes are very flexible. Once you train your ear to hear the correct pitch of these notes without a tuner you will adjust automatically. Now that you know they are sharp all you have to do is play them flatter.
 

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I've found these notes sharp on any alto. The Yamaha 62 is as in tune as any other alto. You can close the right key stack or finger high E and F without the palm D key or bring down the pitch by relaxing your throat and embouchure. These notes are very flexible. Once you train your ear to hear the correct pitch of these notes without a tuner you will adjust automatically. Now that you know they are sharp all you have to do is play them flatter.
I agree with this,strangely the 'worst note' I have found on some 62 alto's is open C# being flat in relation to surrounding notes--i'm talking about horns prior to any setting up/regulation.
 

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I agree with this,strangely the 'worst note' I have found on some 62 alto's is open C# being flat in relation to surrounding notes--i'm talking about horns prior to any setting up/regulation.
There really isn't any setup. I'ts a flat note.
I'm on my 2nd 62. I've also found the C# flat on most altos except for the Selmer Series 111 which has a special tone hole which opens when C# is played. C# is not always flat. In certain harmonic contexts like when it is the 3rd of a major cord it might sound in tune but it will usually be flat to a tuner. When you know that C# is a flat note, there is no excuse to play it flat. 00X G#key with the octave key is an excellent fingering. You can also use the regular open fingering and add one of the right hand side keys or as most students do, play it flat with the excuse "it's a flat note"! There is a way to adjust the pitch of every note on any modern horn, either with an alternate fingering, the embouchure or the position of the tongue.
About once a week someone looks at a tuner and starts a thread about their sharp upper register or flat middle C# which is good because you can't correct them until you realize there's a problem.
 

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There really isn't any setup. I'ts a flat note.
I'm on my 2nd 62. I've also found the C# flat on most altos except for the Selmer Series 111 which has a special tone hole which opens when C# is played. C# is not always flat. In certain harmonic contexts like when it is the 3rd of a major cord it might sound in tune but it will usually be flat to a tuner. When you know that C# is a flat note, there is no excuse to play it flat. 00X G#key with the octave key is an excellent fingering. You can also use the regular open fingering and add one of the right hand side keys or as most students do, play it flat with the excuse "it's a flat note"! There is a way to adjust the pitch of every note on any modern horn, either with an alternate fingering, the embouchure or the position of the tongue.
About once a week someone looks at a tuner and starts a thread about their sharp upper register or flat middle C# which is good because you can't correct them until you realize there's a problem.
With due respect I was simply stating a fact, from a technicians viewpoint. After nearly 40 years blowing horns and flutes I know all the quirks! I also try to discourage my few-- nowadays--pupils from depending on tuners unless they play in 'guitar bands'.
Incidently the C# vent on Serie3 alto's only comes into operation on C# 3--I have such a model myself. The most "in tune alto" IMO is the the Conn 6M--- of any vintage.
 

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Incidently the C# vent on Serie3 alto's only comes into operation on C# 3--I have such a model myself. The most "in tune alto" IMO is the the Conn 6M--- of any vintage.
Actually, it is on C#2, in that both vents are open on C#2 (unlike any other saxophone), and when you depress the octave key for C#3, it closes one of the two vents. This system does two things: raises the C#2 relative to other horns, and lowers the C#3 relative to many horns. On my SIII alto, this octave is perfectly in tune, with no lipping or special fingerings. When I say perfectly, I mean dead on, 0 cents flat/sharp.
 

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Actually, it is on C#2, in that both vents are open on C#2 (unlike any other saxophone), and when you depress the octave key for C#3, it closes one of the two vents. This system does two things: raises the C#2 relative to other horns, and lowers the C#3 relative to many horns. On my SIII alto, this octave is perfectly in tune, with no lipping or special fingerings. When I say perfectly, I mean dead on, 0 cents flat/sharp.
I think this is exactly what I said, having owned a Series 111. It's the only alto I ever played that didn't have a flat C#.
 

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With due respect I was simply stating a fact, from a technicians viewpoint. After nearly 40 years blowing horns and flutes I know all the quirks! I also try to discourage my few-- nowadays--pupils from depending on tuners unless they play in 'guitar bands'.
Incidently the C# vent on Serie3 alto's only comes into operation on C# 3--I have such a model myself. The most "in tune alto" IMO is the the Conn 6M--- of any vintage.
You mean C#2. Thats the note that's flat on most altos.
 

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Yes guys I did get it somewhat back to front!
Vent on Serie3 open on C#2--closed on C#3. This arrangement is used on most modern soprano's by 'splitting' the small C# key.
Back to YAS 62's, for some reason C#2 does sound 'flatter' than 'normal' on some models very often due to surrounding key heights being on the low side.
As far as high F venting --OP question--the jury is still out on this. Many players have the Front --auxillary F key--set to open very slightly, acting as a vent rather than a key. This arrangement sometimes favours the altissimo but a lot depends on the make/model of sax IMO
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks to everyone for the replies. It makes me feel a lot better that I'm not experiencing anything unusual, as far as being way out of adjustment or regulation (although it will be regulated soon as i'm overdue).

I recall my Yanigisawa alto was a little more in tune overall, but it had a few quirks too...

Shawn
 

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i've a tenor 62 and that notes are sharp (it is natural on yamaha) but never like that.. just 15/20 cents at most.. all the rest very in tune... that notes are easy to adjust, but what you are saying is way more sharp..
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, those notes tend a little sharp and I think at times I'm adding to the problem....
 

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I had a YTS-62 and now have a YTS-32 and YTS-875 but play tenor the least out of the other sizes. I've found with Yamahas the high notes on tenor from D to F# are very solid and I know that if I want a high D, Eb or E it will be a high D, Eb or E that will sound without any embouchure adjustment or anxiety.

Being used to how Yamahas play up top and their reliability and solidity of tuning I'm not so comfortable playing on a MkVI tenor for example as these notes take some finding if you're not used to the instrument. Every instrument has its quirks and it's a case of getting used to your equipment - and don't expect every instrument to play like the one you've got used to playing.
 

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I´m a proffessional saxophonist and have to tell you that when my 62 was in the technitian I use my son´s YTS25 for important gigs playing excellent in all registers.
 

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There really isn't any setup. I'ts a flat note.
I'm on my 2nd 62. I've also found the C# flat on most altos except for the Selmer Series 111 which has a special tone hole which opens when C# is played. C# is not always flat. In certain harmonic contexts like when it is the 3rd of a major cord it might sound in tune but it will usually be flat to a tuner. When you know that C# is a flat note, there is no excuse to play it flat. 00X G#key with the octave key is an excellent fingering. You can also use the regular open fingering and add one of the right hand side keys or as most students do, play it flat with the excuse "it's a flat note"! There is a way to adjust the pitch of every note on any modern horn, either with an alternate fingering, the embouchure or the position of the tongue.
About once a week someone looks at a tuner and starts a thread about their sharp upper register or flat middle C# which is good because you can't correct them until you realize there's a problem.
C# is flat on most Alto's but is easily compensated with the right lower palm key.
 

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I have found it helpful to clip on on vibration tuner when performing, like a good sharkie, I think it's called, not the guitar model, but the chromatic one that's new and very fast response for any note for about $15-30 on eBay.
 

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I have an old (early 1970's) YTS-21 tenor - a former school rental, so it's dented, dinged, and looking sandblasted. But! It is dead-nuts on from low Bb to high F. Seriously, just for fun, I use this ancient SabineMT8000 tuner, which can transpose, and I can quickly reach 0 (zero) cents off on my YTS-21 when I go through my long tone exercises.

My Cannonball tenor is a different story: just inconsistently sharp and flat in different areas.
 

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Of my many Yamahas I've had I have never noticed trouble. Some will some wont as ever.
 
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