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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In my search for a soprano , I am increasingly drawn to this model due to many good reviews and an assumption that it is a step above other intermediate Taiwanese horns merely because it is a Yamaha. ( excuse my ignorance )

In Yamahas own words it is for intermediate level musicians- what exactly constitutes this definition as opposed to their ' pro ' horns?

Thanks for help.
 

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yss475

I,VE got a 475, excellent instrument for what it is,good quality,engineering typical yamaha, plays beautifullythe keywork finish not quite up t the pro models.
Get the right mouthpiece /reed set up and you wont be dissapointed,
Check out www.shwoodwind.co.uk
If you have,nt already the site gives an in depth review of the 475.
bryan
 

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I first bought the 475. Played it for a week and traded up to the 675.

The 675 for me was much more free blowing and had far better intonation. Plus, I then had a choice of curved or straight necks.
 

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I feel the YSS-475 is a top notch horn. If there are intonation issues I´m inclined to think the problem is really with the player. Sopranos are more demanding than alto or tenor. Nice thing about the 475 is that it´s a classic one piece design with very refined modern key work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
JSpoon said:
I feel the YSS-475 is a top notch horn. If there are intonation issues I´m inclined to think the problem is really with the player. Sopranos are more demanding than alto or tenor. Nice thing about the 475 is that it´s a classic one piece design with very refined modern key work.
Excellent...I just bought one. Can't wait to try it.
 

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Dave -

The first sax I bought was a 475. It played well, but later I traded it for a 62, and never missed the 475. It is heavier (physically), less refined, and sounded less good vis-a-vis the 62. The legacy of the 62 is, indeed, well-founded.

As fine a horn as it is, I sold my 62 because I felt that Japanese sops sound too modern for my ears and are a bit bright. So, now I am looking for a vintage sop.

Anyway, enjoy your Yami!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm sorry I can't take you seriously with a Borat avatar.
Thanks for the info , very niiice ;)
 

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Hi-Five!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Lol .
 

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Any PRO horn should be free blowing, excellent intonation, and rich tone. I have played the 475 recently and it does not have the rich tone of some of the PRO models I have played. It is also not as free blowing, especially high F. For the same money (as a 475), you can find a Yani stencil that has all the characteristics I mentioned above.
 

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Everyones different. I have compared the YSS 875 and 475 and prefer the 475 which I found more free blowing, sweeter and rounder sounding with more resonance, lighter weight and more comfortable overall. I am not a Yamaha fan but this horn surprised the hell out of me. I still have the same True Tone that I bought in 1975 but right now I enjoy the Yamaha more.
 

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I have a 475 soprano and love the thing. I know it doesn't have the richness in tone as the professional models but since its mostly a secondary horn I'd rather spend my funds on an alto or tenor first.
 

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475 will cover anyone's soprano needs unless you plan on being the next Kenny G (which I hope you won't) so buy a 475 and an expensive mouthpiece.
 

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My two yijiao's worth:

From a marketing standpoint, the difference between an "intermediate" saxophone and a "pro" horn is a matter of status in the market. The intermediate designation is usually based upon a lower price point, thereby relegating it to a lower status. The "intermediate" horns that I've looked at and played worked for me just as well as the ones designated "pro".

Just look back five years ago: would anyone EXCEPT ME accept a Jupiter 767 or any Jupiter as a pro horn? Probably not. I remember getting razzed for my statement that my Borgoni soprano was an excellent instrument. NOW look at the general acceptance of that brand name.

Oh, I am sure that there are some veritable dogs that are categorized as an "intermediate" for one reason or another when they really belong hanging from the bow of a ship.

It's largely a matter of marketing and public acceptance (everything else being equal).

Now, think of this: how many of you would perform a gig with a sax that has chrome keys and a brass body? The combination screams "STUDENT HORN!".

At least, it did when I was a student. maybe that has changed.
 

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My King Super 20 looks like that it screams but not student horn
 

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<snip>

Now, think of this: how many of you would perform a gig with a sax that has chrome keys and a brass body? The combination screams "STUDENT HORN!".

At least, it did when I was a student. maybe that has changed.
I do - I use a Yamaha YTS23.
That's when I'm not using my sub £200 Chinese cheapy...

Regards,
 

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I hate to go off topic - but Stephen I'd love to see a review on your site of a YTS23, given what you just said. And BTW your review of the YTS62 was a large contributor to my confidence in buying a 62II. I was not disappointed. Thank you!
I've reviewed the YAS21...in mechanical terms the review will work for the YTS23. To be honest I didn't realise I hadn't formally reviewed the YTS23 - I'll do so when I have some time ( there's an update due soon, and I'm currently finishing up reviews on some nice tenors ).

Regards,
 

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( there's an update due soon, and I'm currently finishing up reviews on some nice tenors ).
Sounds like Christmas is coming early. I always love reading the reviews Stephen. Keep em coming!:)

Regarding the 475 Soprano, I will have to say that it's currently my favorite modern soprano. It's very free blowing (almost blows like an alto), has extremely good intonation, and the ergonomics are very comfortable. The only things that seperate the 475 from Yamaha's top end line are plastic pearls, the lack of engravings, the single neck design, and the lack of blued steel needle springs. Last time I looked, the 475 and 475II went for around $1,500 new. You can probably find one for under $1,000 used.

I currently use an Ultra-Cheap Chinese soprano that was made several years ago. Tonally, the 475 is VERY close to my horn. Meaning that it's BRIGHT, but hardly thin. The response is SLIGHTLY better on the 475, but what really sets the Yamaha apart are its palm keys. Usually, it's fairly difficult to get the palm notes to speak on sopranos, and it takes a lot of time to adjust your embouchure/airstream to get the horn to sound just right. The 475 does not have this problem, and that sets it apart from most sopranos on the market. If you're new to soprano sax, you'll have no trouble learning how to play with the YSS-475. Enjoy the horn.
 
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