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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, this might be a cool idea. I think the easiest way to do it is to post a short sound clip or name a spot in a recording.

I'll go first: Coltrane, Bessie's Blues (2:09).
 

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pete christlieb w/louis bellson starting at about 3:22 on "quiet riots." the whole solo screams, but his opening phrase slays me. the sax section passage preceding the solo (and throughout the tune) is pretty outrageous too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Whew, Dexter is a goldmine of tasty licks. Check ou tthe album "Take the 'A' Train", Dex plays a tretty hot lick over the 3rd and 4th bar D7(b5) at 1:52 and another similar lick at 3:57.
 

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It's really hard to choose just one lick, but I like the "Cry Me A River" lick, so called because it's the first phrase of that old standard. From high to low the notes are D, C, G, Eb, D, C. Obvious uses are over a Cm7 or Cm9, but can also be used in variety of other spots. Do some searches, there's a good discussion here somewhere.

It's used in various rhythmic forms. I used to hear this lick all over the place and couldn't figure out what it was. Once I found out I was surprised how simple it is.
 

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Frank D said:
It's really hard to choose just one lick, but I like the "Cry Me A River" lick, so called because it's the first phrase of that old standard. From high to low the notes are D, C, G, Eb, D, C. Obvious uses are over a Cm7 or Cm9, but can also be used in variety of other spots. Do some searches, there's a good discussion here somewhere.

It's used in various rhythmic forms. I used to hear this lick all over the place and couldn't figure out what it was. Once I found out I was surprised how simple it is.
That's the first "lick" I learned in all twelve keys thanks to Jim Riggs :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Frank D said:
It's really hard to choose just one lick, but I like the "Cry Me A River" lick, so called because it's the first phrase of that old standard. From high to low the notes are D, C, G, Eb, D, C. Obvious uses are over a Cm7 or Cm9, but can also be used in variety of other spots. Do some searches, there's a good discussion here somewhere.

It's used in various rhythmic forms. I used to hear this lick all over the place and couldn't figure out what it was. Once I found out I was surprised how simple it is.
Yeah, thats a good one. When I have used it, it has been a la Hank Mobley. I cant really describe it in words but in notes, it can be used over the 9th and 10th bar of a blues. SImply (in the key of G) play B-A-E-B-A, eight notes starting on the and of one. Then on the next bar, play Bb-Ab-Eb-Bb-Ab, in the same rhythmic pattern, I usually resolve to the tonic of the I chord in the next measure.
 

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It's a good lick that can also create leading tone melodies using extensions of the chord... For example ...

B7 going to an Em (or E major ... doesn't really matter)

Over the B7, you could play D, C, G, Eb, D, C and resolve on a B when you get to the E chord. #9, b9, b13 all in one lick. Seventh mode of your ascending melodic minor is a good way to think of which "cry me a river" lick to use on the spot. (i.e. B is the seventh degree of C "jazz melodic minor," where jazz melodic minor is the ascending "normal" melodic minor scale.)

Jeez ... I sound like Mr. Riggs now :)
 

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My favorite is from Cannonball, on the song "Flamenco Sketches" on the Kind of Blue album. It is near the end of his solo, when Cannonball plays this line starting on the low E of his alto:

E G# B A C# D# F# E

(the last "E" is held longer, and then followed by F# G A B A).

All these notes are in the key of Eb, as opposed to concert pitch.

In my dreams, Cannonball is the sax player I sound like.
 

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hehe, I got another CANNONBALL lick.

don´t know if it´s maybe too long to call it a lick...but i think it qualifies.

It´s the beginning of his solo on "GEMINI", right after the chorus.
 

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Woody Shaw 1:23-1:25 (2nd chorus, 7th and 8th bars of the form) "There Will Never Be Another You" from Solid...really interesting use of surround tones/target tones over the iimi7-V7-I in Ab Major.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Check it out: this was the first lick I ever learned in all 12 keys. Its referred to as the "Honeysuckle Rose" lick. Simple, but can sound hip if applied correctly.

First, over a 1-bar ii-V (described in the key of C):

Eight notes starting on 1: G,F,A,C. Followed immediately by 2 quarter notes on 3 and 4: E,D.

Or, over a two-bar ii-V (in C, again):

1) play the first lick over the ii chord
2) play the tritone sub of the lick over the V chord.
 

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saxymanzach said:
Check it out: this was the first lick I ever learned in all 12 keys. Its referred to as the "Honeysuckle Rose" lick. Simple, but can sound hip if applied correctly.

First, over a 1-bar ii-V (described in the key of C):

Eight notes starting on 1: G,F,A,C. Followed immediately by 2 quarter notes on 3 and 4: E,D.

Or, over a two-bar ii-V (in C, again):

1) play the first lick over the ii chord
2) play the tritone sub of the lick over the V chord.
Cool man, I like it!

One that I think is kind of cool is over the V7 chord...substituting a ivmi7 chord.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I wrote out the lick from my first post, for anyone who doesn't have the album. (But you should own this album, "Crescent", it's one of Trane's finest recordings.)

 

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Discussion Starter #15
And here's another good lick for those who prefer something a bit "out there."
Its a JJ Johnson lick, meant to go over the 3-5 bar of a blues:

 

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Discussion Starter #17
SaxJazz12 said:
If the chord is a G7 (V7), playing a digital pattern, etc based off a Fmi7. It's also called a "back door". Sorry if I wasn't clearer!
Yeah that sounds cool. You'd basically be playing the upper extensions of the G7 chord, nice idea!
 
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