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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've done a search but didn't find anything on the YAS280, other than some comments about it being a nice solid beginners sax with good ergonomics, which is good in so far as it goes because I got one last year and am just starting to find time to play it (I use the term 'play' loosely!).

Is there anything one should look out for?

Are there any notes that aren't so easy to hit, other than by being not yet competent?

Should one contemplate a different neck?

Is the mouthpiece it comes with fine for now or does one need to change sooner rather than later?

And anything else that I don't yet know to ask!

Thank you in advance :D
 

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i just recently bought a yamaha Bronze series custom Z
before i got it though i had a P. Mauriat Le Bravo sax, although pretty pricey for a intermediate sax it was worth all the money
 

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This sax was recently bought in our community band. I did not try it myself, but another guy with more than 50 years of playing experience tried it. His verdict: It was almost as good as his trusty YAS 62.

Moral: This sax (and the mouthpiece) is more than good enough for a beginner and intermediate sax player. Ask again when you have played it for at least 5 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This sax was recently bought in our community band. I did not try it myself, but another guy with more than 50 years of playing experience tried it. His verdict: It was almost as good as his trusty YAS 62.

Moral: This sax (and the mouthpiece) is more than good enough for a beginner and intermediate sax player. Ask again when you have played it for at least 5 years.
Excellent news indeed! I shall happily stick with it :)
 

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No comments?

Does this mean it's too much the beginners sax to need to know anything about it?
There really isn't anything left to say as Yamaha have done all the work and the rest is up to the player.

They're probably the best entry level saxes on the market and they will do what you want them to do from day one. It still means you should buy one from a reputable dealer with repair/set-up facilities to be sure everything is fine once they've been unboxed, unwrapped and had the key wedges removed as well as the three largest adjusting screws checked so they're properly adjusted prior to sale as they're often backed off so no harm is done in transport with everything wedged shut should they get thrown about during shipping.

One significant problem I do have with Yamaha is their use of waterproof/airtight pads which are made with leather that has a plastic coating which makes them seal very well so response is excellent, but the downside is they can get very sticky (especially the G# and low C# pads and also some of the LH main action pads), but the majority of makers are also using pads made with similar treated leather so it's pretty much a universal thing.
 

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i remember when i started playing saxophone(2nd grade)i played with a yamaha intermediate alto sax
then i moved up pro sax when i was in 7th grade.
the sax i got was a black lacquer custom z
yamaha intermediate and pro saxes have a big difference and i recommend that if you are looking for a beginners sax that you rent the beginners sax and when you get better then buy a intermediate or pro model
 

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Super Action 80 Tenor, Yamaha Vito YAS-21 prototype, Kessler Soprano, Superba II Bari, Fender J-Bass
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i remember when i started playing saxophone(2nd grade)i played with a yamaha intermediate alto sax
then i moved up pro sax when i was in 7th grade.
the sax i got was a black lacquer custom z
yamaha intermediate and pro saxes have a big difference and i recommend that if you are looking for a beginners sax that you rent the beginners sax and when you get better then buy a intermediate or pro model
And what precisely are those "differences" between the student, intermediate, and professional horns?
 

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student sax: buttons are harder to press to train finger motions, doesn't have a high f sharp key, not as high quality, harder to make a good tone.
Intermediate sax: buttons are slightly easier to press yet not as easy as a pro, has a high f sharp key, sounds better than a student sax in general
Pro sax: the king of saxes, barely have to touch buttons to make them go down, looks cooler, sound is naturally amazing in tone, does not take as much air to blow,
has a high f sharp key, but if you don't start at a lower level sax before you go to pro sax, than playing will be really hard for you.
 
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