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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
Noob back with another noob question.
I've been playing a YAS-26 since brand new for about 8 months. As it was a new horn, the outside of the neck tenon and the inside of the receiver was a nice shiny brass colour.
Over time I can now see by the wear marks on places of the neck tenon and the inside of the receiver that they don't perfectly mate.(there are some visible low spots on both the tenon and receiver) They feel like a snug fit going together, and not much force is required on the receiver screw to secure the neck. Definitely no dings on the tenon.
As far as I can tell it hasn't caused me any playing issues.
It looks as though over time as it wears, the more surface area is mating.

Bearing in mind the horn is basically brand new,is it worth having the tenon and receiver lapped by a tech for a better fit or do you believe with normal use/wear, it will it slowly bed itself in over time ?

Thankyou in advance for your wisdom.
Noob.
 

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not much force should be required.

you write “ Mate” and “ Mating” while you probably mean Matte and Matting ( as in “ not shiny” ) . It’s normal. You can clean the neck if you feel you need to (and if it would ever catch) with a non abrasive metal polish or simply with a bit of cloth, but there is no special harm in any of this that you describe.
 

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I actually think he meant to say mate and mating, in that there are areas that are still very shiny suggesting that the surfaces are not contacting each other (mating). Maybe some photos from the OP would help clear this up.
 

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well, that may be American or Australian English but Matte means dull, not shiny and matting is the relative verb in BE, I thought in AE it was Mat and Matting.

Anyway to have a dull, not shiny surface on the tanen is perfectly normal

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/matte
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I actually think he meant to say mate and mating, in that there are areas that are still very shiny suggesting that the surfaces are not contacting each other (mating). Maybe some photos from the OP would help clear this up.
Exactly that :)
 

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Tenons and receivers are not perfectly round, whether on new horns or old. The important question is whether this lack of contact all around the tenon perimeter is enough to cause a leak. If you can play up and down your horn easily, it probably is not causing any problems. If, on the other hand, you are struggling with clean low notes, you might want to test for a neck leak. There are many threads on this forum that talk about ways to check for a neck leak. Here is one such thread:
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?174097-Indicative-of-leaking-neck
If you try this method, be sure to wipe the cork grease out of the joint thoroughly when finished.
 

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Tenons and receivers are not perfectly round, whether on new horns or old. The important question is whether this lack of contact all around the tenon perimeter is enough to cause a leak. If you can play up and down your horn easily, it probably is not causing any problems. If, on the other hand, you are struggling with clean low notes, you might want to test for a neck leak. There are many threads on this forum that talk about ways to check for a neck leak. Here is one such thread:
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?174097-Indicative-of-leaking-neck
If you try this method, be sure to wipe the cork grease out of the joint thoroughly when finished.
Agreed, though I've experienced issues outside of low notes when the neck doesn't match the receiver. It's not too shy about letting you know that there's an issue either.
 

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The best way to check a neck tenon is with a neck leak isolator or neck checker. Expanding, lapping, expanding, lapping almost "ad infinitum" to achieve perfectly matched surfaces is a tedious and expensive process and is not necessary to get a perfectly airtight connection. In fact the bottom 1/4" inch or so is all that really matters to create a seal. Getting a good fit at the upper portion of the tenon has more to do with keeping the neck from turning with 1/4 turn of the neck screw.
 

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In a nutshell, don't worry about it. At some point the neck will get too loose and you'll have to get it fitted. Until then, don't worry, be happy!
 
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