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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started soprano sax about one year ago, right now I'm playing a Selmer S-80 D with Hemke #2 reeds on my Yanagisawa S901, and though it sounds pretty good.
The stock mouthpiece of my Yani sop is HR #7, and it is too larger tips opening to blow for me.
I was looking for a better metal MP.
So my question is, is the Yani Metal #6 (the same brand with my sop) best for me?
I'd like to hear some suggestions.
Thanks.
 

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Your question cannot be answered (at least truthfully and objectively) - no one but you knows what is best for you.

And, why the metal mouthpiece? Most experienced players will tell you that it isn't the material, it is how the overall mouthpiece is designed. I have hard-rubber pieces that outplay my metal mouthpieces on soprano. And I prefer non-Yanagisawa mouthpieces on my Yanagisawa sopranos.

Oh, it well could be that a Yanagisawa Metal #6 will be a good player for you, but it will end up being a combination of your personal physical characteristics and the dimensions/design (chamber size, baffle, tip-opening, length of lay, width of rails, etc.) of the mouthpiece, not the material from which it is made.

If you like the S-80 D, consider a Super SEssion in similar size. DAVE
 

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I think those Yani mouthpieces both HR and metal just come in 5,7 and 9. That's all I have seen but I might be wrong. The metal ones are pretty nice players, I had a 7 but sold it because it was a bit to edgy for me. I play a 7 HR Yani on a Yani 902S that has been refaced and it is very nice. All you can do is try the 5's in metal and HR. I thought the stock piece that came with the horn was 5? Basically you just need to try some different mouthpieces if you can get hold of them at a store or something. You have to experiment but the Yani pieces are pretty nice and I have tried a bunch.
 

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If you're looking for a mellower mouthpiece like your S-80, I'd stay clear from the Yani metals. I play one, but I like that contemporary, bright-ish soprano sound. Side by side, the stock HR 5 one that came with by S991 had a much more spread, mellow sound than my metal 9, which made it good for classical stuff. The metal responded faster, was noticeably brighter, and the beak felt better for me (I like smaller-profiled/smaller-beaked mouthpieces). It's worth noting that the metal Yanis have a more pronounced rollover baffle than the HR, plus a square chamber.

On the plus side for the HR: it was much easier to control in the high register before I got used to the metal one.

The good thing is that all the Yani pieces are of very good quality, so you don't really have to worry about going around and trying multiples of the same type of mouthpiece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think those Yani mouthpieces both HR and metal just come in 5,7 and 9.
The Yani metal MP #6 is available, unfortunately #6 is the only tips openning choice in the store.
I thought the stock piece that came with the horn was 5?
Yes, Every body say that the stock piece is #5, but it is #7 for me. I would like to point out, the Yani sop was new one, I bought it from the dealer of HK directly.

I don't think I can try it if I don't buy it in China music store, so I'd like to hear suggestions and help me make decision.

By the way, I like Kenny G's tone. Can the Yani metal MP make me sound close to?

One more question, Should I try larger tips opening since I get more and more confidence after practice?
 

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The Yani metal MP #6 is available, unfortunately #6 is the only tips openning choice in the store.

Yes, Every body say that the stock piece is #5, but it is #7 for me. I would like to point out, the Yani sop was new one, I bought it from the dealer of HK directly.

I don't think I can try it if I don't buy it in China music store, so I'd like to hear suggestions and help me make decision.

By the way, I like Kenny G's tone. Can the Yani metal MP make me sound close to?

One more question, Should I try larger tips opening since I get more and more confidence after practice?
I'd go smaller myself. It will probably take some time before you will feel comfortable on a large tip opening on soprano. The 7 is plenty for me and I've played for years. I know some great players that play much smaller tip openings on soprano.

As far as KG you could probably get a sound something like that on the metal 6 Yani but I don't know what his setup is. Maybe someone else on SOTW knows or I think maybe KG has website and forum where you could maybe get that info. I think he plays a MKVI, don't know the mouthpiece. Good luck.:)
 

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As far as KG you could probably get a sound something like that on the metal 6 Yani but I don't know what his setup is. Maybe someone else on SOTW knows or I think maybe KG has website and forum where you could maybe get that info. I think he plays a MKVI, don't know the mouthpiece. Good luck.:)
Kenny G still plays on a Dukoff, I believe. But Bill Evans does, too... so that makes it OK!

I should clear up what I meant earlier when I said "contemporary soprano sound". I meant more along the Dave Koz-y kind of tone - rather bright, but not annoying and piercing/nasal. I can do Kenny G on my metal Yani if I want to... if I choose to, I can also do Coltrane - although those are both kind of extreme, in my opinion. Generally my soprano sound is probably a 7/10 in brightness. The closest person's sound I can compare it to is - once again - Dave Koz... but ever so slightly darker.

Also, the 9 is only a .68", which is tiny to me. I use 3.5 Plasticovers to compensate, though.
And like previous posters, I've only seen the Yani metals offered in 5, 7, and 9. If you switch to a metal Yani 5, I would recommend moving up a 1/2 strength or so in reed hardness.
 

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Kenny G still plays on a Dukoff, I believe. But Bill Evans does, too... so that makes it OK!

I should clear up what I meant earlier when I said "contemporary soprano sound". I meant more along the Dave Koz-y kind of tone - rather bright, but not annoying and piercing/nasal. I can do Kenny G on my metal Yani if I want to... if I choose to, I can also do Coltrane - although those are both kind of extreme, in my opinion. Generally my soprano sound is probably a 7/10 in brightness. The closest person's sound I can compare it to is - once again - Dave Koz... but ever so slightly darker.

Also, the 9 is only a .68", which is tiny to me. I use 3.5 Plasticovers to compensate, though.
And like previous posters, I've only seen the Yani metals offered in 5, 7, and 9. If you switch to a metal Yani 5, I would recommend moving up a 1/2 strength or so in reed hardness.
Um, not trying to start an argument but to avoid confusion I don't think I would call .68 on soprano tiny even to you. The 7 HR I play has been refaced to .63 which seems to be about average for experienced doublers on soprano anyway. When you consider that the Selmer E facing that Coltrane played was probably around .53 yours is not really tiny. Have a good one.:)
 

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Um, not trying to start an argument but to avoid confusion I don't think I would call .68 on soprano tiny even to you. The 7 HR I play has been refaced to .63 which seems to be about average for experienced doublers on soprano anyway. When you consider that the Selmer E facing that Coltrane played was probably around .53 yours is not really tiny. Have a good one.:)
Considering that I prefer large tips on other horns (.110-.120 on alto and .120-.135 on tenor), I think I know when a .68 soprano mouthpiece qualifies as "tiny for me"... especially when I have to use rather hard reeds on it. I was just pointing out my personal preference on Yani metals. I found them to play easier than the tip openings would make them seem.

And no offense to any fans of Coltrane's soprano sound reading this, but I think he sounded like absolute trash on the thing... so if anything, I should be glad I don't play a .53!

Just kidding (about the "not playing a .53" part, not the "sounded like trash" part. :mrgreen:).

Now preparing for a serious :tsk: -ing...
 

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Yeah, well I think this was supposed to be advice to a beginning to intermediate soprano player. Everybody's embouchure is different, Phil Woods gets a nice big full sound on a Meyer 5, some people get a huge sound on a 7* on tenor. Some people close down the reed on a big tip and that's how they play it, not all mind you but some. As far a Coltrane's sound on soprano I won't touch that one, we must have very different taste. Good luck.
 

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I started soprano sax about one year ago, right now I'm playing a Selmer S-80 D with Hemke #2 reeds on my Yanagisawa S901, and though it sounds pretty good.
The stock mouthpiece of my Yani sop is HR #7, and it is too larger tips opening to blow for me.
I was looking for a better metal MP.
So my question is, is the Yani Metal #6 (the same brand with my sop) best for me?
I'd like to hear some suggestions.
Thanks.
According to charts, the Yana HR #7 has a tip opening of 1.5mm and the Selmer D is a tip opening of 1.3mm. 1.5mm is pretty much a medium tip on soprano, and 1.3mm would be small or "close". All of which suggests you should be looking for a fairly closed tip if considering a new piece. Once such piece would be the Yamaha 4C which has a tip opening of 1.2mm. A nice easy piece to play with a good balanced sound and intonation. Or consider the Yana HR #5 which is 1.33. I play a Yana HR 6 which I opening up to 1.57mm - but that's just what worked best for me. Don't overlook the Yana HR soprano pieces, they are great pieces and my personal favourite after trying quite a few other brands.

The Yana metals are well made, but I never really dug the square chamber. It's mainly the chamber that defines the tone rather than the material.
 
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