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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2012
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Hi All,
just stumbled over a local classified ad about a Yanagisawa T-40 tenor in rather poor looking condition (haven't actually seen it yet). It seems to have an overslung neck, like Yani's intermediate horns.
Does anyone have a clue what this model is, and when they made them ?
Based on scattered info on the net, there has been a T-4 tenor, so might this one be T-4+ or a T-4-II (and 2 for tea...) ?
Thanks !
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Contributor 2010
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It is probably a T-4. Here is some info:

http://woodwindforum.com/?page_id=57

I owned a T-4 stencil briefly. I would describe it as an entry-level pro horn. Build was good. Post-on-body construction. They had left off some features to keep the price down. For example, it had side-key rod guides so picking up the horn with your right hand could easily bend rods. Ergos were nice. Pinky table was non-floating but worked quite well. It did not have an underslung neck. Tone was nice with good intonation. They are worth looking into, I think.
 

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dexdex: I saw that one, too, and wondered about the model number. I have to agree with trice until proven otherwise - it looks like a T-4. Given that the 4 series shares a lot of basic features with the 6 series, I'd say he's probably correct about the characterisation of the horn as "entry-level pro".

I own a A-6 and B-6, and while they're also post-mounted instead of ribbed, they're very well built and sturdy. Sound's well centered, bright and stable - these aren't mellow horns, they're very agile in tone and response. Still, I wouldn't say they're screamers - singers is more like it. Their sound has a good vibe to it, with lots of hoisted power... And yes, I actually consider the two real brothers when it comes to sound (there's a family resemblance there that's not only coincidence).

I'm prepared to argue that this horn would actually be an upgrade to my late T-500 (which is almost, but not quite a T-900 already... different body, it seems), but I think I'll wait for an opportunity to put my hands on T-6...

M.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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I have had a A4 alto. Although it is a god horn I wouldn't class it any better than being an intermediate horn. The A4 I had was in many ways comparable to a Grassi Jade Rollers.
 

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They are good back-up horns if you are used to the feel of a Mark VI. I picked a T4 up for $500 bucks and couldn't really ask for a better "bar horn". Unlike a lot of other Asian horns I've played, it feels the same way every time I pick it up. Nice, well built horns.
 

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Regardless of classification, these horns are real players, like all Yanagisawa horns, and they're very well built. I agree that the 6 series is a little better, but that doesn't mean the 4 series horns are bad. I'd say play it and handle it to find out if it suits you. I clearily prefer my A-6 over my SA80II in terms of sound and action, and even my T-500 (a scheduled "intermediate" horn) is impeccable when it comes to build and sound quality. And my B-6 has kept its regulation for four years of heavy duty use now - only recently I felt the need to have it regulated in the near future; I will only say that this is *not* the case with a SA80, a so-called pro horn with a good reputation. The horn in question is priced quite competitively - as long as bids don't go too high...

M.
 
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