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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone who knows the story tell me why and when Yanagisawa started making stencils using the Vito name? Also, what were the different models, I know that there was a S6 patterned after the MVI but what were the others? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I just saw an old thread from 2011 " Yanagisawa Soprano History and Identification" that has a SN chart and some good information. Still looking for more though
 

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Are you only looking for info on VITO stencils from Yani?
Yani's had other stencil names.....I believe Astro, Whitehall, and Martin besides the Vito to name a few.
 

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The earliest Yanagisawa-made Vito soprano I have seen was 1972, but there are reports of Vitos as early as 1970. S6 stencils were manufactured as early as 1968, but I do not know of any Vitos this early. Vitos before Yanagisawa stencils are associated with Beaugnier. I know Beaugnier made sopranos for Vito in 1968 and probably 1969. These are 5-digit S/N in the 20,000-24,000 range. Those dates would match up with Yanagisawa starting the manufacture of Vitos in 1970.

On the other end, straight Vitos were made until 1981-82 as the VSP model. The S800 was introduced in July 1978 and Vito seem to have received these updates, whereas Martins seems to have retained some of the S-6 features, at least superficially.

You can tell when a 1970s Yanagisawa (stencil) was made. The first one or two digits are the month. the next two digits will start with 7 as the 70s year. The following 3 or 4 digits are the actual s/n.

Here are three examples.
1172845 - November 1972 #845
3763668 - March 1976 #3668
03786042 - March 1978 #6042

The leading 0 seems to be dropped or included randomly.

As to differences between the S6 and S800, that is the subject of another thread that will take a side-by-side comparison. They have the same tone hole configuration, although there might be slight difference in the key work mechanics. Superficially, the engraving changed, the lacquer process changed, the thumb hook went from metal to plastic. These changes were made to make the soprano match the rest of the Yanagisawa line. Yanagisawa claims they made minor improvements within model runs.

As for why Yanagisawa made stencils...Yanagisawa was virtually unknown outside of Japan and had not yet established a public reputation. Martin had contracted horns with them. A second contract with an established brand name like Vito would have been a real boon.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The earliest Yanagisawa-made Vito soprano I have seen was 1972, but there are reports of Vitos as early as 1970. S6 stencils were manufactured as early as 1968, but I do not know of any Vitos this early. Vitos before Yanagisawa stencils are associated with Beaugnier. I know Beaugnier made sopranos for Vito in 1968 and probably 1969. These are 5-digit S/N in the 20,000-24,000 range. Those dates would match up with Yanagisawa starting the manufacture of Vitos in 1970.

On the other end, straight Vitos were made until 1981-82 as the VSP model. The S800 was introduced in July 1978 and Vito seem to have received these updates, whereas Martins seems to have retained some of the S-6 features, at least superficially.

You can tell when a 1970s Yanagisawa (stencil) was made. The first one or two digits are the month. the next two digits will start with 7 as the 70s year. The following 3 or 4 digits are the actual s/n.

Here are three examples.
1172845 - November 1972 #845
3763668 - March 1976 #3668
03786042 - March 1978 #6042

The leading 0 seems to be dropped or included randomly.

As to differences between the S6 and S800, that is the subject of another thread that will take a side-by-side comparison. They have the same tone hole configuration, although there might be slight difference in the key work mechanics. Superficially, the engraving changed, the lacquer process changed, the thumb hook went from metal to plastic. These changes were made to make the soprano match the rest of the Yanagisawa line. Yanagisawa claims they made minor improvements within model runs.

As for why Yanagisawa made stencils...Yanagisawa was virtually unknown outside of Japan and had not yet established a public reputation. Martin had contracted horns with them. A second contract with an established brand name like Vito would have been a real boon.
Thanks, this helps a lot as my Vito/Yani stencil is one digit away from one of your examples (03786042). Would you know if these are the S800 or the S6 Yanagisawas?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Re-reading your thread, if the S800 was introduced in July '78 then I guess that would make mine a S6 since it has a March '78 SN, correct?
 

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Technically, in all probability it is an S6, and I might call it an S6 if you need a label. Metal thumb hook; D shaped neck strap hook. Yanagisawa had actually unveiled a new line of 15 saxes (S800s and so on) toward the end of 1977, but the official start of manufacture was 07/78. I think they already had changed their lacquering process as evidenced by fewer acid bleeds, etc. It is likely that the stencil contract had certain specifications with which Yanagisawa had to comply. Even after the S800 was introduced, Yanagisawa made Martins to previous specifications, although Vitos received updates. Calling your sax a 1978 Vito by Yanagisawa would also be accurate.

You might find it fun to compare your sax to this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Technically, in all probability it is an S6, and I might call it an S6 if you need a label. Metal thumb hook; D shaped neck strap hook. Yanagisawa had actually unveiled a new line of 15 saxes (S800s and so on) toward the end of 1977, but the official start of manufacture was 07/78. I think they already had changed their lacquering process as evidenced by fewer acid bleeds, etc. It is likely that the stencil contract had certain specifications with which Yanagisawa had to comply. Even after the S800 was introduced, Yanagisawa made Martins to previous specifications, although Vitos received updates. Calling your sax a 1978 Vito by Yanagisawa would also be accurate.

You might find it fun to compare your sax to this one.
This is mine, I won the auction on eBay. Thanks, you've been very helpful and the resource is great!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Are you only looking for info on VITO stencils from Yani?
Yani's had other stencil names.....I believe Astro, Whitehall, and Martin besides the Vito to name a few.
Were the Yani stencils, particularly the Whitehall, Martin, Astro, and Dorado all pro horns or did they also make student models?
 

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As far as I know, Yanagisawa has only ever made pro models. However, as is the nature of stencils, the manufacturing company builds to the customer’s specifications. It does not appear that Yanagisawa ever gave their customers many options. Yanagisawa just basically did what they did and changed the engraving. At least, it appears that way in the straight sopranos.
 

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Yanagisawa made stencils for all these companies? Any others?

Vito, Astro, Whitehall, Martin, Carot, Artist, and Dorado.

Does anyone have the dates associated with these companies?
 

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I guess you just have the photo the Corton Deluxe bell. That thing with the plastics key guards smells of German or Eastern European.
 

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There are 4 pictures of a Cordon Deluxe alto. The "plastic" key guard sax is a Klingsor tenor was made by Hammerschmidt, Burgau, West-Germany.
 

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As far as I know, Yanagisawa has only ever made pro models. However, as is the nature of stencils, the manufacturing company builds to the customer’s specifications. It does not appear that Yanagisawa ever gave their customers many options. Yanagisawa just basically did what they did and changed the engraving. At least, it appears that way in the straight sopranos.
My 1978 Martin Tenor sure looks like the full Yanagisawa treatment. Comparing to my A880, the keywork, neck, etc. do not appear to have been changed by somebody outside of the usual Yan. designs changing over the years.
 
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