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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm new to the forum.
Recently, i bought a used Yamaha YAS-23 and i noticed a little leak on the low C key. What you recommend me to do to solve myself this problem? Can i adjust the key, bending it a lit with a pliers? In this case, is it recommended to heat the key before trying ti adjust it?
I have also noticed that the key is not perfectly aligned/centralized with the hole (is this normal)?
I'm attaching some images below so you could see what i'm talking about.

leak_1.jpg
leak_2.jpg
leak_3.jpg

Any help is appreciated!
Thanks!
 

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Did you notice the leak from playing or visually incorrect.

Have you confirmed the leak with a bright light on the inside

Key geometry / centralised is not an issue if the key is sealing, if the key is not sealing then yes bend or relocate posts for better contact. You may need to replace the pad, you may need to recut the tone hole flat

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks @simso

I noticed the leak both from playing and with a light inside.
I replaced the pad from another sax i have without bending the key and now is sealed.

Thanks!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Super Action 80 Tenor, Yamaha Vito YAS-21 prototype, Kessler Soprano, Superba II Bari, Fender J-Bass
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Thanks @simso

I noticed the leak both from playing and with a light inside.
I replaced the pad from another sax i have without bending the key and now is sealed.

Thanks!
Was the pad from another Yamaha? Is the seat from the old pad perfectly seating with the 23's tone hole? If the answer is no to either question, you may have just replaced a bad pad with another bad pad for the situation it's now in. If you are interested in DYI repairs, I'd recommend purchasing a few brand new pads from musicmedic.com or similar distributers. The new pad will certainly last longer in the long run.

And if you're going to go that route, you might as well pick up a few pads for the low D RH stack key too. The pad of the 23 is a bit undersized there, and is a bit prone to leaking.
 

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You should check the Eb key pad as well - this is usually the worst pad, because the condensation after playing tends to collect there when the sax is stored in its case and the case is stored with the hinges on the bottom.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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You should check the Eb key pad as well - this is usually the worst pad, becasue the condensation after playing tends to collect there when the sax is stored in its case and the case is stored with the hinges on the bottom.
Truth. My students destroy that pad with sugary drinks. No matter what you tell their parents, they still figure out a way to blow into that horn after drinking a 32oz Gaterade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Was the pad from another Yamaha? Is the seat from the old pad perfectly seating with the 23's tone hole? If the answer is no to either question, you may have just replaced a bad pad with another bad pad for the situation it's now in. If you are interested in DYI repairs, I'd recommend purchasing a few brand new pads from musicmedic.com or similar distributers. The new pad will certainly last longer in the long run.

And if you're going to go that route, you might as well pick up a few pads for the low D RH stack key too. The pad of the 23 is a bit undersized there, and is a bit prone to leaking.
Thanks! Very helpful information. I will purchase brand new pads and replace them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You should check the Eb key pad as well - this is usually the worst pad, because the condensation after playing tends to collect there when the sax is stored in its case and the case is stored with the hinges on the bottom.
Thanks! I will look also at this key.
 

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And yes, bending keys to improve the alignment is a common part of sax adjustment, but using non-specialist-tool pliers sounds like a very bad thing!
Manufacturers often have pads off-centre to the tone holes, and often get away with it, although it is not an ideal.
 
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