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Discussion Starter #1
Hello.

I just bought an Yamaha Yts-62.

After checking its serial number, i noticed that it has also a letter before the numbers. Wich made me wonder what does this stands for, since most serials i have seen around the forums have just numbers.

So i post here my serial hoping that some real Yamaha 62 expert outhere reads this and can enlight me with a solid information.

My YTS-62 Made in Japan - Serial Number: C974XX


While doing some search, i only found discussion about the YTS-62E. Rumours said that the "E" was directed to European market, but someone posted on the forum a forwarded email sent by someone from inside Yamaha, a more legitimate information, that the "E" in fact stands for "Export".

I hope the C doesnt stands for CHINA, LOL!!

Now serious... this "C" thing is killing me.
 

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I think you will find if you look closely that the 'C' is actually 0--zero. Your horn would be 0974xxx.
Folks get too wound up with serial numbers ---getting to be like train spotting!
The 62E arrived with the hinged low Bb spatula--or around that time I think. Yamaha are notoriously secretive about serial numbers and year of manufacture for some reason.Nothing sinister! just the way they work.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think you will find if you look closely that the 'C' is actually 0--zero. Your horn would be 0974xxx.
Folks get too wound up with serial numbers ---getting to be like train spotting!
The 62E arrived with the hinged low Bb spatula--or around that time I think. Yamaha are notoriously secretive about serial numbers and year of manufacture for some reason.Nothing sinister! just the way they work.
Thanks for your answer, BUT!

How do you explain this information from parts listing, provided oficially by Yamaha website? Looks like they are not that secretive or sinister. :)
http://parts-search.yamaha.co.jp/ht...?bcate_code=008&mcate_code=016&scate_code=003

Take a look down the list until YTS-62 where you can find serial numbers starting at: #C00001

So im sure my sax has a "C", not a "O".

The point is that i still wonder what the "C" means.

I dont want to start gossiping, but im just wondering if maybe those 62 come out the factory just regulated to orchestras (C standing for Classical)?
OR maybe all 62s are the same and the "C" is just a meanless symbol to serials range.

I post here asking for help to find out the one and only correct answer. I was not yet able to contact Yamaha japan unfortunately, wich i think is the best to provide the correct answer. But i hope im lucky enouth that this topic hits someone who really understand this subject.

Thanks in advance!
 

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I have a YTS-62 that was probably made 2-3 years ago. Serial # C88xxx. It is very clearly a "C".

Does it have to mean anything?
 

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OK, a little mystery! A similar thing happened with Selmer(Paris) About 12 months into the Mk7 era the letter before the serial number changed from M to N. From that time on Selmer s/nos. begin with N. When Conn had reached it's millionth horn--early '60's--a letter C prefixed the numbers.
 

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I have a YTS-62S. Mine was bought in Japan and have the C in it's serial number also.
I've read somewhere in this forum that the C letter indicated an instrument made for the Japanese market.
 

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I think there were a few Friday horns that were just not as good as the others, and were technically defined as being 'c**p horns'. This might be what the 'c' stands for?
 

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Maybe the "C" is for "China"? Just kidding. Perhaps they are using the Roman Numeral "C" as times 100, in an effort to keep their serial numbers from getting too long.
 

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Maybe the "C" is for "China"? Just kidding. Perhaps they are using the Roman Numeral "C" as times 100, in an effort to keep their serial numbers from getting too long.
That sounds sensible. Yamaha dont do 'seconds'. This is becoming a 'Storm in a Teacup'
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi,

The serial question for me is solved. The E was just a comercial classification that was not kept by yamaha to avoid confusion such as we are seeing. The "E" is not even on the parts listing of official yamaha website. All the 62 series listed indicates only serials starting with 0, 1 and C. Where C doesnt mean anything special but just a way to increase serial range since its by far the most produced version ever.



Now how about getting a 62 and having it to look like this? :bluewink:
 

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I worked on an 82Z alto (in silver plate) that also has a C prefix to the serial number only last week. Has to be said there were a lot of things wrong with it that didn't get picked up in quality control - keys binding between point screws, poorly balanced spring tensions and the LH pinky touchpieces not being level with each other which shouldn't be the case on a Custom instrument.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So i read around here that the finish doesnt makes difference to the sound at all.
I believe it does... but we will be talking about details.

Love the bare metal looking. Looks much more like a real saxophone than a brand new shinny toy. Just kidding... :bluewink:

Makes me remember those customized wooden guitars made by luthiers:

If i played strings:



Assuming its playing well, i would pay more for a horn looking like this than a brand new shinny golden lacquered one:



Ive heard that ppl with taste like mine are about only 2%. :mrgreen:
 

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I own 2 Bare Brass Saxes and would own more if the opportunity ever presented itself.

Just FYI, Adolphe Sax himself knew that body material didn't make a difference. He chose brass b/c it was cheap, malleable, and sturdy. So, if the body material doesn't matter then surely the type of finish wouldn't either.

Also, flutes were primarily made out of wood until about 100 or so years ago. Metal or wood, they still sound like flutes.

Welcome to the Forum! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thx Thad! I would love to see pictures of your bare brass sax. :)


Are you sure the complete removal of the finish doesnt change its sound even sightly??

My guess is that being the metal less rigid without gold and lacquer cover, it would resonate more, opening the sound but would become less edgy also, more mellow than standart. Talking about this comparison between the 2 finishes, using the same setup and musician of course.

My only information is a testimonial of a professor who owns an aged (chemicaly) Conn and he sais that the removal of finish turned the sound more focused, more mature, specially cuting down the edges due to the superficial oxidation process the metal suffers. He compares it to his Selmer gold lacquered using same setup.


Thx in advance.



ps: btw, the best tenor sax sound ever: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjpjGSr38d4&feature=related
 

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Many of these myths about brass being part of the saxophone's sound date all the way back to Paris circa 1840s. It is actually the physical design of the instrument: bore shape/size, tone hole placement, bell/bow size, shape of the neck, etc... that give a particular saxophone model it's distinctive timbre.

The vibrating air column will cause the sax to vibrate somewhat in one's hands and maybe the different finish might change this slightly??? This phenomena is not audibly conveyed to an audience. But you will find many, many talented (& not talented) saxophonists, sax manufacturers, & sax dealers who will swear differently.

Adolphe Sax knew the truth 170 years ago. Surely nothing has changed? :whistle:

PS: Here is my Phil Barone Vintage Bare Brass Tenor and also an Adolphe Sax Bare Brass Tenor (not mine :cry:) circa 1855-ish. Bare Brass is my new favorite!
 

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Few days ago i was testing alot of yamaha customs out and also blew on a very rare YTS 62 Tenor,1 of 200 i think,limited edition tenor in a satin gold finish,looked abit like a ref 54 finish but this was a satin finish and it was all 1 shade of gold,looked realy nice.Never seen a finish like it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi guys,

Got another question! :mrgreen:

As far as i know, the type of neck, neck material and neck finish also does affect the sound slightly and also the blowing characteristics. I notice that some pro players switch their saxophone necks like Kirk Whalum, Brecker and others using a silver plated neck that looked different from their instrument, for example.

So i wonder what do you guys can add about this subject. Has anyone tried switching the 62 neck? If yes, what necks will work best for the 62 (mkII, G1)?
 
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