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Discussion Starter #1
HELLO,

Does anyone know what a Yamaha "650F" is? (in gold lettering on the front).
I've been told it's the made-in-Japan version of the YCL650, but ... a lot of people say a lot of things about instruments they're trying to sell, as we all know ...

ALSO, I remember hearing various reasons why Yamaha pro models aren't used much by classical &/or jazz pros, but can't recall exactly what the reasons are. Could anyone shed some light?

THANKS,
--Gord
 

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Can't help on the model, but I can tell you many working pros play Yamaha. Anyone telling you otherwise doesn't know as much as they'd like to think
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for replying Martin,

What I should have said was that Yamahas weren't used that much (back in the last century). I remember in the 70's-80's they were criticized for some technical reason or another, which has probably long since been corrected.
 

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Gord: I've never heard that about Yamaha clarinets. A friend of mine who is a world-class trad-jazz clarinetist has played a Yamaha clarinet for YEARS (at least the early 1990's that I know of).

I don't know what those numbers mean. DAVE
 

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As I understand it...

Any professional Yamaha (at least with the wind instruments) already is built in Japan. So the 650 and 650F should both be built in Japan, but perhaps they were built for different markets. Any Yamaha model number that starts with a 6 or higher (i.e. yas-62, yfl, 685, ycl-650, yts-875) is a professional instrument.

As for the lack of use by professionals...Yamaha student clarinets (leaving the yas-23 out of this...we all know it's one of the best student saxes) used to be no better than anything else, and were not all that common, so people didn't use them. and when they moved up, they stayed away from yamaha because they didn't know them. In recent years, Yamaha has done a lot of work on their woodwinds, and yamaha student instruments are now some of the best out there. As those that have started on yamaha clarinets grow up, i think we'll see a lot more of the pro level horns in regular use.

I know a few that use them, but they are by no means common in the pro world, yet. They are great instruments though, so it isn't for lack of quality that they aren't used.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey, thanks for that sax&strings.

I actually own a YCL 65A (with the silver keys), and I love it - it has a beautiful dark tone, very different from the brighter French models. And, I use it fairly often - (comes in handy when the evil Django guitar clones start swinging fast in C#minor for instance, I can play in E- rather than Eb-).

Also, I think at least one pro made a name for himself using this very instrument, but I can't recall who that was right now.

I will definitely be trying out the '65F', I'm hoping to be able to get it for around $750-800 if it's in good shape (they say it is) and it plays well.

--Gord
 

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Eddie Daniels repped for them in the past, although I don't know if he does now.

There's nothing wrong with Yamaha horns, either clarinet or otherwise. They're not generally considered "top of the heap", but any of them (from top to bottom is a serviceable piece of hardware and will make do for most needs.

I don't like the feel of the clarinets (and have some reservations about the table keys on the saxes), but that's just personal preferences. And, the price is right...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just an update on this: I did end up buying the '65F' - this model is indeed the YCL650 equivalent but made only in Japan (and no longer in production now).

I couldn't turn it down, as this instrument is virtually brand new - played MAYBE half a dozen times by an uninterested student, it is in absolutely pristine condition. Corks are still new & stiff, has the silver-plated keys and quite beautiful, visible wood grain.

I think I got a bargain at $800 (they're out there if you look for them).
 

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Since Yamaha is more or less the newbie on the scene, most professionals were brought up on the French (buffet, selmer, leblanc) makers. They were taught by their teachers who used them, etc.

It will just take time to grasp more professional players.
 
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