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The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum
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Shai, if will go to the advanced search area, type in "Yamaha" in the left side window to search thread titles, then go to the lower right side for the specific forum areas and choose "doubling" you will get a long list of threads about Yamaha flutes; a lot of information that I think will help you.

Of course you'll get current responses in this thread that you started, but many times I've found a great deal of good, sometimes better, info which is in earlier discussions on subjects that come up regularly.
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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".... many times I've found a great deal of good, sometimes better, info which is in earlier discussions on subjects that come up regularly."

Well said. And that is because some of the guys who write the good stuff probably get sick of writing it many times over, and eventually stop.

Brief comment: Putting belief and marketiong aside, I wouldn't really expect a 400 series (solid silver tubing) to play any better than the exact same flute in 200 series (plated tubing).

The "7 " refers to ring keys, off-set G, and Split E.

IMO a good combination, but for perhaps 95% of players there is no point in the ring keys (also called 'open holes' - do a site search on that too) other than some sort of misplaced snob value, unless you are really into unusual effects and playing modern French music. You may finish up plugging them. You could buy a centre digit "1" model, which is the same but without the open holes.

The 600 series has a professional quality "EC" heads which does make a significant difference to how the flute plays.
 

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They are good for students although you hardly see them used in the real world of players. Ask your local teacher and pro players to see what they are using and if they know of anything available in your local area.

There are a lot of options in the beginner/ intermediate area of flutes, it is a matter of looking.
 

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danarsenault said:
Perhaps it is me, but I've found less vale for money in Yamaha flutes as they go up in proce and model number. The 200 series is incredible, though, for what it is and the money.
When I tried the whole range maybe 15 years ago, I thought the same.
I think there have been changes, as for all manufacturers facing the competitive market.

So I am interested in how up to date your evaluation is.
 

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Shai, you really owe it to yourself to check out the relatively new Azumi flutes made by Altus. There are several models and the upper-end ones have the regular Azumi silver head. Here's a link that discusses them. http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?t=52057 After I started that thread I bought one and I'm very pleased with it.

Just a note about that thread. I made a mistake and on the thread title wrote "Altus" when I meant "Azumi", so until I pointed that out, the first few posts are addressing Altus not Azumi. However, since the Azumi is made by Altus some of those comments about the Altus flutes may give you an idea of the quality that company maintains.
 

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I really only liked the 200 series yamaha's. They are probably the only instrument I'd recommend someone to learn on, but it might just be because I worked 4+ years on the yamaha student model and got used to it.

Referring to value, I've tried several of each of 400, 600, and 700 series yamaha's. The 600's are best in value of those, and they all aren't bad, but I would not purchase any of them over a low end sankyo, powell (or sonare), or muramatsu.

For learning, get a YFL221 (200AD?), then save the other money to upgrade later on down the road. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I don't know if it is still the same, but it used to be that the 300 series and the 400 series flutes were identical except for the fact that the 400's were solid silver whereas the 300's were silver plated (but the head was solid silver).

I played a 300 series for many years until a few years ago. It served me very well.

Despite the comments above that the higher number Yamahas are less impressive, I am very happy with my older 500 series (561)..It has an inline g and a b foot and CY head joint. It is very similar to the current 600 series flute.

Steve
 

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Demolisher_2000 said:
When I went to japan, there were 32000$ (CDN) yamahas....I didnt know yamaha made flutes that expensive.
Yep, they do and they are used by some major symphony players and recitalists. Mary Karen Clardy, flute professor at UNT is one. http://www.mkclardy.com/
 

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I want to second the positive comments made about the Yamaha 200-series.

I worked for YEARS to develop a flute embouchure that gives me a respectable quality of sound. However, it always had an airy quality that drove me crazy. One of my flute friends told me "That's your sound". Never the less, I tried many different flutes and the results were always the same....until I got a Yamaha 26S open tone hole flute (older version of the YFL-261) for cheap on ebay last December.

The price was only $160 as I recall. Then, my flute tech checked it over, made some adjustments, and gave it a polishing. Her cost was $95. It looks and plays like a brand new flute! Finally, I purchased one of the new Yamaha curved head joints from WWBW for $113 (as I have arm/wrist problems with a straight head joint) and a replacement flute case designed for a curved head that cost $50. The total cost of this set up was just over $400.

With this flute I FINALLY have the quality of sound I've wanted all of these years. Beautifully focused and projecting sound. I can't begin to tell you how happy I am with this Yamaha flute.

One of these days I'll have to try a current version YFL-261 to see if I can detect any performance differences from the 26S model. However, I'm quite happy with how my 26S plays after my repair tech worked her magic on it.

Roger
 

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The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum
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FWIW, and not to disagree really, but at the same time I tried out the Azumis I tried out Yamaha 200-300 series flutes and it seemed to me that the Azumis had just a bit more depth to their sound. I had a choice of buying any of them and picked the Azumi over any of the Yamahas.

Of course someone might prefer one over the other, so my real point is that, if you like the Yamahas try the Azumi before you make a final decision.
 

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danarsenault said:
Gary, I play a Muramatsu. So if we stood together and I said Muramatsu and you said Azumi, would someone else say gesundheit?
or possibly GEMEINHARDT !

OK - really bad - nevermind.
 

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Got a YFL-225S at a pawn shop a few years ago,been giggin' on it ever since.Locomotive Breath on a mike.Yeah.
 

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"Despite the comments above that the higher number Yamahas are less impressive, I am very happy with my older 500 series (561)..It has an inline g and a b foot and CY head joint. It is very similar to the current 600 series flute."

Steve[/QUOTE]

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Steve, the 561 has an off-set G, not an inline G...that's the 581 in the 500 series.
 
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