Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,456 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 62 tenor and when I get down to playing low C# in subtone and softly- I can hear a loud buzz. It sounds like a hard plastic vibrating loudly against metal, but really I have no idea what it could be. You can hear it a little on low B and not really on low Bflat. Again this is all when playing subtone and softly.

When played at normal level the buzz on the low C# is not as noticeable, but I think that may be just because the sound of the horn drowns out the buzz. Not sure.

Thanks for any help.

No local techs out here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Sounds like you have to tighten the screw that closes the G#. Try to play the low C# and put your right thumb on the F#/G#- arm or on the F#-pad cup. If the sound disappears your problem is that the G#sharp opens a tiny bit and bounces against the cork or whatever material you have on those adjusters. You can try to screw in the screw a tiny bit, best to use some kind of leak light when doing this so you don’t mess up the balance. If you don’t have a leak light, remember where it was and screw a tiny bit, try the horn and so on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,296 Posts
Sounds like you have to tighten the screw that closes the G#. Try to play the low C# and put your right thumb on the F#/G#- arm or on the F#-pad cup. If the sound disappears your problem is that the G#sharp opens a tiny bit and bounces against the cork or whatever material you have on those adjusters. You can try to screw in the screw a tiny bit, best to use some kind of leak light when doing this so you don’t mess up the balance. If you don’t have a leak light, remember where it was and screw a tiny bit, try the horn and so on.
A much easier test is to play low D or low C and (when playing) to press the G# key. You shouldn't hear a difference is the regulation is well done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,456 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hi Guys thanks. When I play low D it sounds fine. Then while playing low D, I press down the G# key on the pinky table and the Buzz starts.

Also, If I pay low C# and lift the low F# key/finger there is no buzz. When I press the F# key down again while playing low C# the buzz comes back of course.

I'm not sure if this means if I have to tight the screw that closes the g# key or not given this new info. And if so where is that screw? BTW this is a new horn (several months old).

Thanks a ton.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,296 Posts
Hi Guys thanks. When I play low D it sounds fine. Then while playing low D, I press down the G# key on the pinky table and the Buzz starts.

Also, If I pay low C# and lift the low F# key/finger there is no buzz. When I press the F# key down again while playing low C# the buzz comes back of course.

I'm not sure if this means if I have to tight the screw that closes the g# key or not given this new info. And if so where is that screw? BTW this is a new horn (several months old).

Thanks a ton.
So, the screw regulating the F#-G# connection needs tightening.
1. Action the G# key and watch your horn. You will see a pad moving: it's the G# pad. You will also see a screw above the pad cup.
2. Tighten this screw very slowly in steps (1/8 turn at each step should be enough, maybe even less when you approach the correct regulation) and after each step, control if a change occurs in low D when you press G#. You stop when you can't detect a change any more, of course! Don't overtighten the screw, because it would harm the notes below F#. To fine tune the regulation, you can make a back and forth: when you have tightened the screw and don't detect a change, back off by a (very) small amount and control again,...
3. When you are happy with the regulation, it would be a good idea to pour a drop of clear nail varnish on the screw threads to block the screw. But don't use anything stronger than nail varnish (superglue would be a very bad idea!).

P.S. When you are at it, you can see an other screw just below this one, that controls the regulation of the bridge between the stacks (to play Bb with the fingerings 1+1 or 1+2)
-when this screw is not tight enough, Bb played using the 1+x fingering is stuffy
-when on the contrary this screw is overtightened, the notes below F# are more difficult to play.
You could also control if the regulation of this screw is correct. Or if you never use the 1+x fingering, at least check that the screw is not overtightened.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
3,409 Posts
So, the screw regulating the F#-G# connection needs tightening.
1. Action the G# key and watch your horn. You will see a pad moving: it's the G# pad. You will also see a screw above the pad cup.
2. Tighten this screw very slowly in steps (1/8 turn at each step should be enough, maybe even less when you approach the correct regulation) and after each step, control if a change occurs in low D when you press G#. You stop when you can't detect a change any more, of course! Don't overtighten the screw, because it would harm the notes below F#. To fine tune the regulation, you can make a back and forth: when you have tightened the screw and don't detect a change, back off by a (very) small amount and control again,...
3. When you are happy with the regulation, it would be a good idea to pour a drop of clear nail varnish on the screw threads to block the screw. But don't use anything stronger than nail varnish (superglue would be a very bad idea!).

P.S. When you are at it, you can see an other screw just below this one, that controls the regulation of the bridge between the stacks (to play Bb with the fingerings 1+1 or 1+2)
-when this screw is not tight enough, Bb played using the 1+x fingering is stuffy
-when on the contrary this screw is overtightened, the notes below F# are more difficult to play.
You could also control if the regulation of this screw is correct. Or if you never use the 1+x fingering, at least check that the screw is not overtightened.
Like the man said! just turn that screw a few degrees at a time till you get it right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,259 Posts
It is more common for a low C# or B not to respond if the G# key is slightly open, not for a "buzzing sound" to take place. In my experience a buzzing sound when playing notes in the low register is usually caused by keyguard screws that are too loose. I have even found a "buzz" coming from key rollers that are dry. These "buzzes" are the result of "sympathetic vibrations" created when the saxophone plays at or near the natural resonant frequency of the part that vibrates. When adjusting the F#-G# or F# - Bis regulation I always recommend using a leak light wherever possible. Of course if you are out playing a gig, turning the screw in small increments and play testing is about the best you can do. I have found you can get quite close by closing the F key with normal playing pressure and pressing the G# touch while watching to see if there is movement in the G# key.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top