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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I currently own two tenors.
A YTS 62 series one and a early 50's King Zephyr.
In generally the keywork seems more comfortable on the Yamaha, except
for the left hand pinkie cluster.
It is pretty smooth but for some reason I have a lot of trouble locating the c#
key smoothly.
The c# key on the Zephyr on the other hand seems easier to connect with but it takes a lot more pressure to activate effectively.
This seems easier to deal with than the Yamaha.
Another thing I have noticed on the Yamaha is the pinkie b key is set at a lower level than the other keys in the cluster.
I don't know if this is normal or not, but the key doen't seem to be bent in any way so I assume it is the normal position for this key.
The problem is it makes moving from low B to low B flat quite clumsy.
Has anyone else had these issues with their Yamaha's keywork?
Can they be improved in the hands of an experienced Tech?
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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"Another thing I have noticed on the Yamaha is the pinkie b key is set at a lower level than the other keys in the cluster.
I don't know if this is normal or not, but the key doesn’t seem to be bent in any way so I assume it is the normal position for this key.
The problem is it makes moving from low B to low B flat quite clumsy"

I see advantages in having the B spatula lower, and often set up saxes slightly like that. It is much easier to drag the pinky from B to C# than it is to push it form C# to B. That is because during the push, the tip of the pinky buts up to the B spatula. It is possible that you deal with this by sloping your pinky up at the tip end.

If you are not employing some trick to overcome the above, then the obstacle of the B spatula for the end of the pinky is less if the B spatula is slightly lower. Having the B slightly lower.

However if you are sloping your pinky up, then I understand how the lowered B spatula may make the b to C# transition clumsy.

Also, modern saxes are usually engineered to have more key travel for these spatulas. I guess this is in preference to most old style saxes needing a lot of finger pressure because of very little leverage when closing the keys. To reduce the force, the travel must be increased. I think the compromise reached as pretty standard by most manufacturers now, is preferable for most players.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The transition from B to C# is OK as is the reverse. I struggle more with the transition from B to Bb.
Pinkie gets caught up on the Bb roller as the gap between the keys is more than can be managed with a roll of the finger.
It feels like I have to lift up from B key to depress Bb key.
This often results in a low C sounding in between. (if that makes sense?).
My problem with the C# is more to do with the linking on the outer edge.
I seem to hit the link rather than hitting the C# which gives me the sound of C# with a leak rather than a good solid note.
Perhaps I'm being a bit picky, but I really like the action on the Yamaha apart from this.
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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"Pinkie gets caught up on the Bb roller as the gap between the keys is more than can be managed with a roll of the finger."
Try forgeting the roller, and putt your finger at a slightly different angle and position, so it can slide along the ramp.

"I seem to hit the link rather than hitting the C#"
Better train your finger!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Training my finger is probably right.
I'm sure it will be worth the effort in the long run.
Will try to make a concious effort with positioning of finger.
 
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