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Discussion Starter #1
ok so sometimes when i slur from a D to a C# or a C i keep squeaking and it's driving me crazy because the songs i play usually make me slur from D to C# or C. it sometimes happens when i tongue the notes but not as often as sluring. anybody got and ideas as to why i keep squeaking and now my horn doesn't have any leaks i've had it checked out last week.:line4::space3:
 

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Check your reed placement. Bend your reed tight over the tip and make sure it covers it all, maybe even a hairline showing past the tip. Lots of stuff can cause it, though.
 

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Sometimes the octave slop, if you are using your 8va key when you slur, can contribute to squeaking. Try not using your 8va key and ckeck cork and etc. Make sure you don't have too much 8va slop, some slop 'is' necessary.
 

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For me, it squeaks when my embouchure is too tight, or throat is not "open" enough. Also sometimes because the reed is too dry, and last but not least, the mouthpiece had a bad facing. There're more to add to the list.

For C#/D or C/D transitions, my teacher taught me to use the palm D w/o octave key to get the octave D note. I tried but on different horns the combinations are different - some uses palm Eb, some add middle C and so on. He didn't recommend always using it though - he said it's just for fast passages and to reduce difference in timbre for some horns.
 

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That's a lot of fingers to get up at the same time (including letting go of the octave key. Lazy fingers can cause interim fingerings that will precipitate a squeak. I have that problem on my tenor between the next C up and the A or G below it. Also, (I've been told) that high baffle mouthpieces will be more prone to squeaks in precisely that situation. Don't know if that applies to you. Too soft reeds also contribute. I'm going to be aware of the reed placement mentioned by click.
 

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Try playing D and while holding the note, lift the octave key lever off (still holding D) and slur to C#. If it is OK, then it is the horn's octave key (the one on the body).
Make sure the reed is lined up on the mouthpiece.
Make sure the ligature is holding the reed tight.
If all else fails, it may be a faulty mouthpiece, uneven rails, warped table.....
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hmm well for the higher octave it's alright the squeaking happens when it's a D with octave key not palm keys.
 

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hmm well for the higher octave it's alright the squeaking happens when it's a D with octave key not palm keys.
If you are referring to my reply, I'll try explain...I'm talking about a method of getting a D2 by palm D only. Normally palm D + octave key gets D3. Without octave key, it sounds D2; depends on designs, this can be in-tune or way off. The student horn I used make D2 by palm Eb + middle C. Anyway it's a bit irrelevant to your core question...

The octave key testing posted by other SOTWers are good, you should try it first. If it's not the octave key, it can be the mouthpiece, your embouchure and support or so. Maybe you can tell us what mouthpiece and reed you are using.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you are referring to my reply, I'll try explain...I'm talking about a method of getting a D2 by palm D only. Normally palm D + octave key gets D3. Without octave key, it sounds D2; depends on designs, this can be in-tune or way off. The student horn I used make D2 by palm Eb + middle C. Anyway it's a bit irrelevant to your core question...
so u mean using the palm key without octave key will get me the same sound as D2. hmm it'll be harder remembering to do that but i'll try it out and see if it works.
 

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Yes this is not as intuitive as normal fingerings. I don't use it much, but it serves well as trill keys and fast passages.
 
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