Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, all

About a decade ago I sold all of my solo saxophone literature, thinking I'd never need it again.
I was half-wrong: my teenaged daughter has become serious about her saxophone studies and is ready to dig into this music. (This I could not have predicted back in 2004....)

Anyhow, I'm looking to purchase saxophone-piano sets of some of the staples of the alto solo literature: Ibert's Concertina da Camera, Glazunov's Concerto, Creston's Sonata, etc.
I'd also be interested in the Marcel Mule etude books (got rid of those, too...)

I'm posting here because second-hand is fine with me.

Do you have an extra set you'd be willing to sell? Or, like me many years ago, do you find yourself not needing them any longer?

PM me to discuss.

Many thanks!
~ Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,723 Posts
Scribd has most of these things plus a ton more.....you could spend $10 for a one month subscription and download PDFs of all kinds of great literature.
 

·
Registered
Selmer Balanced Action Tenor Saxophone, Powell Flute
Joined
·
3,657 Posts
Scribd has most of these things plus a ton more.....you could spend $10 for a one month subscription and download PDFs of all kinds of great literature.
+1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi folks,

Thanks for all of these responses.

I'm not sure how this music can be royalty-free and in the public domain.
The Creston, for instance, was completed in 1939, and would require a good 15 more years before it moves into the public domain.
The Glazunov in 1934, Ibert in 1935...same stories.

Can anyone clarify the legal ins and outs that I seem to be missing?

Warmest regards,
Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
Hi folks,

Thanks for all of these responses.

I'm not sure how this music can be royalty-free and in the public domain.
The Creston, for instance, was completed in 1939, and would require a good 15 more years before it moves into the public domain.
The Glazunov in 1934, Ibert in 1935...same stories.

Can anyone clarify the legal ins and outs that I seem to be missing?

Warmest regards,
Rick
The time after which a piece of music becomes royalty-free depends on the country you're in. Many countries only have a 50 years span, while others use a 100 years span...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The time after which a piece of music becomes royalty-free depends on the country you're in. Many countries only have a 50 years span, while others use a 100 years span...
Sure, but Creston was American, and here the general cut-off for copyrights is music that was written before 1923 (give or take a couple years — I don't remember the exact date at this time). So, unless I'm missing something — or Creston's estate did not seek © extension — I would expect his work to still be protected by US Copyright for another 15 years or so.

Does anyone have any further information or clarification?

~ Rick

p.s. David Erato — you're observation is likely true. (But, that's OK -- I don't consider myself an expert on this stuff by any means).
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top