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Discussion Starter #1
I just wanted to ask your opinion on something. I am not a professional player. I am still at the stage of my playing life where I am a paying member of music societies. I am getting better, but i dont do paying gigs. I have a pretty good alto and a student model tenor. I am playing a selmer series iii alto in one big band and playing a YTS 23 in a semi-pro big band (at least that is what the members call our playing level).

Here's what I've got...
Selmer Series III Alto and Yamaha YTS 23

Should I ride out this combo? Or should I sell them both and go for two lower quality pro horns


YTS 62 + YAS 62 VS YTS 23 + Selmer III alto

Both played equally...
 

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It depends. Does the YTS 23 hold you back? Are you unhappy with your sound on the tenor? Did you get complaints? If not, I would not risk ending up with a worse combination and selling and buying can also be stressful. If yes, I would first look at the mouthpiece. Often switching to a better mouthpiece (better meaning one that suits your needs and characteristics better, not just overall quality) does the trick. Do not change instruments just because yours is labeled as a student instrument.

However, if you are truly unhappy with what you have and you like your mouthpiece then do not stay with the instruments that make you unhappy too long. It will sour your enjoyment of making music.
 

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Hang onto the III, and find out later in life if you need/want a similar quality tenor. At this stage, you sound dispassionate about which horn you actually PREFER.

On a snarkier day, I would say get rid of both, and buy a good tenor. :twisted:



Tenor - It’s all that matters. To me. IMNSHO.
 

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I wouldn't get rid of the III unless there was something specific I didn't like about it. Have you played many other horns? I'm not sure what your motivation is; it seems like you want to use the $$ value of the III to get a nicer tenor -nothing wrong with that- but if your main experience is playing in these "music societies", there may be a certain 'attitude' coming from the group about what horns people should and shouldn't play.

I won't encourage getting caught up in other players judgements about your horns, but I would encourage you to play different horns and see if something else connects with you as a player. It's not a bad thing to be in love with the horn you play; to be captivated by the sound of it, to get a little thrill every time you pick it up. THAT'S the quality you should look for in a horn, regardless of it's cost or what other players think about it. It's not an appliance, it's a partner.
 

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Buy mouthpieces:)

Seriously...why do you feel the need to upgrade...or do you just think you should?

I was only half joking...you will get more bang for your buck with good mpcs than entire new horns.

If you felt better horns sounded significantly better then go for it...but you dont seem to have a burning desire to change. If you do it does not come across in your post. I dont know why you should sell the alto unless you just dont dig alto. Robbing peter to buy paul will always catch up with you.
 

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Buy mouthpieces:)

Seriously...why do you feel the need to upgrade...or do you just think you should?

I was only half joking...you will get more bang for your buck with good mpcs than entire new horns.

If you felt better horns sounded significantly better then go for it...but you dont seem to have a burning desire to change. If you do it does not come across in your post. I dont know why you should sell the alto unless you just dont dig alto. Robbing peter to buy paul will always catch up with you.

I like this answer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Buy mouthpieces


Seriously...why do you feel the need to upgrade...or do you just think you should?

I was only half joking...you will get more bang for your buck with good mpcs than entire new horns.

If you felt better horns sounded significantly better then go for it...but you dont seem to have a burning desire to change. If you do it does not come across in your post. I dont know why you should sell the alto unless you just dont dig alto. Robbing peter to buy paul will always catch up with you.
I am happy with the sound of the horn. It is a bit clunky ergonomically and clicky when I am attempting to play softly, but the timbre is beautiful and I just had it tuned up.

I have an amazing mouthpiece. I really dig my sound. My selmer iii is like holding onto warm butter. Fits and almost has a perfect mould of my hands.... whereas holding my tenor is like holding onto my great grandmother's arthritic hands. Lumps and bumps that would almost scare a young child. (Actually it did when I was little.... "please not story time grandma!" Lol). Side keys are so far out. Personally, not worth a 1000 or 1500 upgrade... but ask yourselves, what do you play? Why dont you still have your student model if they are so great?
 

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Here is my thought...and I would buy a different tenor but thats me....but my reasons would be different. I wonder if your tech could make the horn a little less clunky...its not the nature of that horn (at least Im pretty confident). A horn that is 10k can click and klunk if not silenced. Maybe its worth a few bucks to have that addressed, not just leaks. Im not a tech but I know there are things that can be done to silence a horn a bit (short of stealing your reeds). The YTS is solid ergonomically...maybe some special attention can address some of the things that concern you.

I would not suggest you upgrade until you have a solid sound concept and want something else specifically. Otherwise you may upgrade and in two years realize its not serving your sound concept as it develops. Then you will get back on that expensive circus ride again.
 

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I would focus on one horn. Maybe Alto? then sell the tenor and take lessons with the money. You can sound incredibly different with lessons and playing better. that is much more possible than buying a new or better whatever. the new horn won't have better time, better inflections, more knowledge of changes. you get the picture. Also I agree, dont touch a horn purchase until you have a piece settled on . good luck thats what I did. Im focusing on alto until I get paid a large amount to strap on the extra 6 lbs of my Mk6 tenor K
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here is my thought...and I would buy a different tenor but thats me....but my reasons would be different. I wonder if your tech could make the horn a little less clunky...its not the nature of that horn (at least Im pretty confident). A horn that is 10k can click and klunk if not silenced. Maybe its worth a few bucks to have that addressed, not just leaks. Im not a tech but I know there are things that can be done to silence a horn a bit (short of stealing your reeds). The YTS is solid ergonomically...maybe some special attention can address some of the things that concern you.

I would not suggest you upgrade until you have a solid sound concept and want something else specifically. Otherwise you may upgrade and in two years realize its not serving your sound concept as it develops. Then you will get back on that expensive circus ride again.
Does the YTS 62 and 23 feel similar? I just love the closeness of everything on the selmer.
 

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I'd be wary about selling the Selmer, sounds like you have an affinity with it.

As to the YTS-23, as others have suggested, this should be a good horn. SH Woodwind has a good site with a great review of this sax, have a read before you do anything.

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Reviews/Saxes/Tenor/yamaha_yts23.htm


I just had my 1985 YAS-23 serviced, pads replaced, neck tightened, I asked the tech to lighten the action and it plays really, really well. The lacquer looks very average (ex-school instrument, so treated a bit rough), but mechanically it is fine. I played a friend's Yamaha Custom EX alto recently and it was good, but I was happy with how mine held up against it.

If you know a good tech, have a chat and see what can be done to give your YTS-23 a bit more zip. You said you recently had some work done, but it still might worth a chat to see if there is anything to adjust.

Or, as others have said, look at mouthpieces. That might make a difference to make you happy and keep what you have for a bit.
 

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Simply put I would not buy a Yamaha tenor.

Well made horns that just dont float my boat at all.

Thats not to say I dont like other players music that play them...I just cant warm up to them.

The OP is happy with his sound but finds his keywork too loud...this can be fixed by the right tech...then he will be happy and spend very little.

To me this seems the obvious path given what we have been provided.
 

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Every year when the music ed. association meets here in Maine, the vendors are there with all their horns, and I took the opportunity a few years ago to focus on trying all the higher end tenors. It was really fun- I ended up getting a silver Yamaha custom Z (I like silver horns), but it was fun to try all the brands. Too bad there wasn't much of a selection of MPs to try with the different horns, but I live in a low population state- bigger places would have much more. Maybe there is a similar situtaion where you live to try a bunch of horns-
 

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My advice - keep the Selmer alto - you will regret selling it sometime in the future. Get the YTS-23 fixed and playing its best; if it feels "clunky", then things like key height (including the side and palm keys!), spring tension and good quality adjustment corks/leather/teflon will make it much better.

The YTS-23 is certainly capable of pro-level performance, assuming it's in good repair. If someone gives you shXt about it, just say "Yeah, well..." and ignore it, that person is just being obnoxious. If it's really that you just want a better horn, start putting those tips in a piggy bank! But keep your alto!!!!
 

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If you like the way you sound and the ergonomics work for you keep them. The grass is always greener on the other side until you get there. But if you're unsatisfied with your sound and you're always at the repair shop getting something fixed, then go for something new. You are an the right track with Yamaha instruments. Best quality for the price.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you like the way you sound and the ergonomics work for you keep them. The grass is always greener on the other side until you get there. But if you're unsatisfied with your sound and you're always at the repair shop getting something fixed, then go for something new. You are an the right track with Yamaha instruments. Best quality for the price.
Update: I sold my yts23 and bought a 61. Best move of my life. My new horn plays so well. So happy
 
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