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hi SOTW

i'm considering taking voice lessons at the community college, so super cheap, i was a walk on in my high schools varsity choir. i'm having a bit of a phrasing problem as i'm not an alto player. i was wondering if you think this would be a good investment.

(i sung bass)

i know it won't magically fix them and sometimes singing doesn't correlate with playing, i know some fantastic players that can't sing to save their life

thanks
happy holidays
 

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It should help your pitch and musicality. Should help your phrasing as it would help you practice organizing your breathing. Singing is almost always a good idea for musicians. You haven't made it clear exactly what you are trying to work on with singing to help your sax playing.
 

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If you play jazz and improvise then singing is great.
Scat singing will help your approach to improve lines.
Sing a line then play it. Listen to many great pianists, they sing their solo while playing it.
Listen to George Benson, he does it alot.
Same with Slam Stewart on bass.
Even if your voice isn't great singing will help.
 

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Great idea.

Singing will help with articulation and phrasing.

I find that especially knowing the words of any “ song” ( if what you are playing is a song, sometimes it isn’t) helps greatly. Improvisation is born into your mind and the less you put between the mind creation and the music that you produce the better.

As non reader my playing is really an extension of my singing. I have begun years ago, as a teen ager, in a progressive rock band by playing flute and singing, then I progressed to saxophone playing but I still sing.


The human voice is the most natural instrument that humans have.

Our brains are hard wired to produce sounds by means of the voice and if you can expend that ability you will certainly gain extra creative baggage.
 

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one really has to be able to sing to play saxophone,or any instrument, well...
good luck with it all....
cheers,philip
I don't agree with this idea at all .... I think it's simply wrong. But, will learning to sing (from a teacher) help a non-singing sax player? Absolutely! Especially if the lessons are cheap or at least reasonable (mine were $50 an hour). Intonation, at the very least, as long as you don't become an "Autotune" singer. And phrasing. And emotion. As my singing coach used to say, "You gain volume and emotion by connecting emotionally to the words you're singing." Singing can be very useful in sax lessons, as my teacher has continually pointed out .... Learning to sing can also get you more work (backup vocals). I like Milandro's idea of learning the words to songs that you are going to solo over on your sax. Dexter Gordon did that. The human voice is the original instrument that all mechanical instruments were patterned after. The best thing about learning to sing is that you don't have to stress getting an instrument (vintage? new?) ... You've already got one. Go for it!

Turtle
 

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I signed up for a sight singing/ear training class at the local community college based on my teacher's recommendation. It was completely worth the time, but man did it take time! I was signing 4-5 hrs a week plus class to keep up. My ear improved very noticeably. It did take me a few months of consistent singing to have any reasonable level of control of voice. I do not think it has impacted my tone or embouchure outside of better recognition of pitch. I've add the step for all tunes I am learning to play over to be able to accurately sing the roots without any backing. It has been great for making changes easier to hear in music too. I've come to realize at this point that if I cannot sing it then my brain doesn't really know it.
 
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