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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm more than positive that this has probably been covered but, who are some world renowned classical saxophonists?

Aside from all the common ones we know:

Donald Sinta
Tim Mcallister
Otis Murphy
Arno Bornkamp
Kenneth Tse
Nobuya Sugawa
John Sampen
Chien-Kwan Lin
Joe Lulloff
Claude Delange
Rousseau
Etc....


I'm trying to find more artists to listen to, I'm not too familiar with any German, Italian, or Russian saxophonists. I'm only familiar with american/french saxophone playing styles. Please I hope you guys have suggestions of artists' that will broaden my saxophone playing.
 

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Check out this thread, for starters: Classical Saxophonists' Websites

Are you primarily interested in current players, or people from the entire history of the classical saxophone? If the latter, you should investigate figures such as Sigurd Rascher, Marcel Mule, Larry Teal, etc. It can be harder to locate records by players from the past, although there's a current thread here about Rascher's recordings, and it's easy to get recordings by the Rascher Saxophone Quartet, the ensemble he founded that is still working.

Everyone should check out James Houlik because he is probably the greatest classical tenor player of all time, and has done a lot to create/expand the classical repertory for that instrument.

You also might be interested in British players such as John Harle and Simon Haram. A top Russian player is Sergey Kolesov, whom I just mentioned in another thread.

Btw, it's Delangle, not Delange. I also like Jean-Yves Fourmeau among current French players.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, this is very much helpful

I'm familiar with James Houlik, his tenor playing is pretty captivating. I would be more interested in current players.
 

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I would be more interested in current players.
????

He's still quite active. From his website, regarding some of his 2014 activities:

"I also toured in Texas, with master classes and recitals at Texas Christian University, the University of North Texas, the University of Texas – San Antonio, etc. I played Russell Peck’s The Upward Stream with the Ludwig Symphony in Atlanta, but the big news is the new version with band which I performed for the first time with the University of Michigan Band. I went directly from Ann Arbor to Lisbon, Portugal, which I played the new band version of the Peck two more times with the band of the Lisbon Conservatory of Music."

Maybe you meant "up-and-coming"?
 

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Rascher guys/girls:

John Edward Kelly
Carina Rascher
Lawrence Gwodz

Also:
Steven Mauk
Lynn Klock
Dale Underwood
Jean-Yves Formeau
John Harle
Jean-Marie Londeix
Vincent David
Daniel Kientzy
Harvey Pittel
Fred Hemke


Really, I could go on and on here...
 

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Abato is strangely forgotten these days. He had many students in his day and legend has it that Charlie Parker would occasionally rent a practice studio next to Abato's just so he could eavesdrop on lessons.

Abato died back in 2008, but he did it all in his long career. He played saxophone in jazz bands and classical settings and he played clarinet in the NY Phil.

He didn't believe in talking about equipment like horns, mouthpieces and reeds, but he did spend many years on a Buffet Rational-System alto.
 

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Abato is strangely forgotten these days. He had many students in his day and legend has it that Charlie Parker would occasionally rent a practice studio next to Abato's just so he could eavesdrop on lessons.

Abato died back in 2008, but he did it all in his long career. He played saxophone in jazz bands and classical settings and he played clarinet in the NY Phil.

He didn't believe in talking about equipment like horns, mouthpieces and reeds, but he did spend many years on a Buffet Rational-System alto.

I've been looking for a Vandoren Vincent Abato mouthpiece forever. I wouldn't say he was the best ever, but he was a very important pioneer. His recording of the Glazunov was one of those recordings that everyone seemed to own.
 

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They didn't make very many, and it's kind of a cool relic.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 

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If there were such a thing, I would have to argue for Londeix as the "best" classical saxophonist. More than just about anyone, he demonstrates on the saxophone the kind of musical expressivity and flexibility that one normally associates with strings or the voice. Most virtuoso classical wind players, even with their incredible techniques, don't let you forget they're operating mechanized instruments which can't really compete with the expressivity and flexibility of strings or the voice, and they don't often transcend the limitations of the instrument's accumulated performance history and practice to really get at the heart of the musical matter. It seldom goes beyond, e.g., "excellent trumpet playing" or "convincing saxophone playing," as enjoyable as they can be. But when I listen to Londeix's recordings, I can sometimes fool myself into believing that he wasn't just "playing fabulous legit saxophone" but approaching a level of expressive making-music that I would expect only from, say, a prominent violinist or coloratura. And that's no small feat, given that the repertoire for our instrument -- despite Londeix's unmatched efforts to develop it -- doesn't boast a great deal of masterpieces on which to rely.
 

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If there were such a thing, I would have to argue for Londeix as the "best" classical saxophonist. More than just about anyone, he demonstrates on the saxophone the kind of musical expressivity and flexibility that one normally associates with strings or the voice. Most virtuoso classical wind players, even with their incredible techniques, don't let you forget they're operating mechanized instruments which can't really compete with the expressivity and flexibility of strings or the voice, and they don't often transcend the limitations of the instrument's accumulated performance history and practice to really get at the heart of the musical matter.
Londeix has a mighty technique, but I'm not partial to his sound. I prefer a somewhat darker, sweeter tone. I don't find his tone bad, just not really captivating to me. And tone is always a key determinant in one's preferences for wind players.

As for the comparison of wind instruments and strings, while I agree that key-based systems can tend to produce a slightly chunkier stream of sound than the vocal-cord-like violin family, you may be underestimating the advantage of actually being able to sing into one's instrument, rather than rubbing something with a stick. E.g., "Most virtuoso classical string players, even with their incredible techniques, don't let you forget they're operating manual instruments which can't really compete with the organic lyricism and tonal flexibility of woodwinds or the voice ...." :)
 

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You will probably never hear of Dr. Ronald Attinger, Teal's first doctoral student. He was my teacher and as good as anybody I've ever heard - period.
 

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Michael Duke
Barry Cockcroft
Christina Leonard

Just a few off the top of my head from Australia!
 

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Here are some more names.

Taimur Sullivan
Gary Louie
James Umble
Jean-Michel Goury
Marie-Bernadette Charrier
Daniel Gauthier

And since you asked for players outside of the French and Americans:

Zagreb Saxophone Quartet (Croatia)
Ties Mellema (Netherlands)
Niels Bijl (Netherlands)
Raaf Hekkema (Netherlands)
Marcus Weiss (Switzerland)
Lars Mlekusch (Austria)
Simon Haram (Britain)
Masataka Hirano (Japan)
Hiroshi Hara (Japan)
Yasuto Tanaka (Japan)
 
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