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I just finished my 3rd repad/overhaul of a silver saxophone using the MusicMedic white roo pads, and have compiled some tricks along to way to keep the pads from getting soiled as you work with them. Some may be thinking why use them if they are such a bother to keep clean? My answer to that is simple. They are quiet, they don't stick, and they look beautiful on overhauled silver saxophones.

Here are some things I have learned the hard way.

-Once the pad protrusion has been determined by dry fitting a few pads, glue all of the pads into their key cups in a single step.

-When each pad is glued into its key cup, wrap each key and pad in clear Saran Wrap until it is time to install that key.

-Keep your hands and bench meticulously clean when handling keys with the pads in them.

-Invest in some inexpensive white cotton gloves sold by the dozen on eBay.

-Do not add shellac too close to the edge of the pad so that it oozes out the side when the key cup is heated.

-If you have polished silver keys and/or the silver body of a saxophone clean those areas thoroughly with alcohol to remove all traces of the residue---especially the toneholes!

-Most important!!!! Do not oil or grease any key or roller until the entire sax has been repadded, adjusted and regulated. Then remove one key or section at a time and carefully oil the mechanisms when you are absolutely certain that it is the last time the part will be off the instrument.
 

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Yeah. Keeping them white is a pain in the butt, but they do look great!
 

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I've used the white Roopads twice now - first on a silver plated Selmer Adolphe alto which I suggested to the owner as it would look better with an instrument of this age and a silver plated MkVI tenor at the request of the owner. Not the easiest things to keep looking pristine, especially in combination with silver plated instruments and there was a lot of going over with solvent to clean any dirt or oil that got on them before (when checking them for fit in the pad cups), during and after all the work was done.

Even when using white cotton gloves for most stages of the work where the pads came into play didn't stop any mishaps, but as long as you have all the necessary quick-fix items at hand then you can put any mishaps right. I used the crystal clear shellac with them as any that oozed around the edges could be cleaned up easier by chipping it off when cool and wiping with alcohol to dissolve and remove any stubborn bits.

I even offered the owner of the tenor a pair of white cotton gloves to use when he came over to play-test it before he took it away as I was still nervous about getting fingerprints or any dirt on the pads!

But I'll only ever use white Roopads if specifically requested - otherwise I use Saxgourmets as standard as the fear of them getting dirty is far lower.
 

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I had a set of white roo pads fitted on my Silver Pearl Borgani Jubilee some months back.
So far, no staining issues, but I do keep it in it's case when not being played.
I find the white roo pads softer than the black , which I tried on an earlier Horn .
They needed very little playing in, and have sealed perfectly since , with no sticking problems .
Best pads I have tried yet!

Blowhard2
 

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-Most important!!!! Do not oil or grease any key or roller until the entire sax has been repadded, adjusted and regulated. Then remove one key or section at a time and carefully oil the mechanisms when you are absolutely certain that it is the last time the part will be off the instrument.
I have always done this even with brown or black pads...just keeps everything cleaner, and if it doesn't play silky smooth with no grease/oil, then I'm not done with the overhaul yet.

A couple more thoughts, as I have done probably a dozen overhauls with the white roopads (4 of them on my personal horns)

- Use either white shellac or the clear stuff from MusicMedic...then a tiny ooze drop isn't a big deal.
- Use domed resonators, as they keep the surface off the bench better
- I clean the toneholes with wadded aluminum foil, as it burnishes the surface of all the little scratches that might harbor some residue. The surface of aluminum foil is very hard...

...the white roopads are much quieter and feel nicer (to play on) than the black ones....I'm assuming that the black ones still have the metal backing under the leather. My personal Superba I baritone has the black ones and it's a bit 'slappy' when being played vigorously.
 
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