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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Discussion Starter #1
you would think that they would have some high baffle metal pieces to go into their catalog with saxes.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Yeah, right - like Yamahas need to be any brighter...

How 'bout Yamaha-brand ice picks? Now there's a line of accessories that'll bring 'em in. :twisted:

Am I getting any closer to my endorsement deal???
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Discussion Starter #3
Lol...ok i agree with you there but even hard rubber pieces instead of that plasti-rubber hybrid stuff.
 

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Yamaha has now one plastic line (C) and one HR line (CM) , they know that their saxophones need to be sold with a mouthpiece but they don't focus on selling those.
Unlike Yanagisawa they run a truly huge operations which is probably the largest of its type in the world. Selmer , although very large too, has a long standing tradition in the production of mouthpieces. You shouldn't forget that Yamaha arrived relatively late on the saxophone market.

BTW I disagree on the definition of the Yanagisawa as to be high baffle (if that's what you mean Raphyel)
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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4C is great value for money.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I didn't say that the pieces aren't any good, but just that they have never released any premium pieces. And Milandro I agree with you the Yanagisawa pieces aren't high baffle, but they are premium, which was really what I was getting at. I would have thought that they would have released some high end metal pieces to go with their horns, similar to Selmer of Yanagisawa.
 

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I think that the answer derived by the history is that they are not interested in producing mouthpieces other than two types for their saxophones. Other Brands too were uninterested and at best only bought them (Jupiter, Keilwerth, SML, BUffet, ...........) you name it
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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Yep,

Yamaha has gone into special mouthpiece production for trumpets. They offer a whole range of custom trumpet pieces. My daughter really likes her Yamaha "Heavy Weight" that came with her Xeno. I don't know why they don't do the same for saxophones.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Perhaps they appreciate that cultivating a sufficiently large, skilled work force to hand finish the pieces well is too much to take on. Trumpet mouthpieces are much more friendly to simple machine tasks.
 

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I suspect that since they're a business it has to do with profitability. That would be a lot of design/production/marketing/distribution for an inexpensive product. It's not like they haven't thought about it.
 

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I didn't say that the pieces aren't any good, but just that they have never released any premium pieces. And Milandro I agree with you the Yanagisawa pieces aren't high baffle, but they are premium, which was really what I was getting at. I would have thought that they would have released some high end metal pieces to go with their horns, similar to Selmer of Yanagisawa.
Raph - The Yamaha (C) Soprano mouthpices are absolutely premium pieces. They dont cost a premium and they dont say premium, but they are premium.
 

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I would like to see Yamaha make the C series in rubber and some more open tips for alto and tenor. I find the 4C for alto a bit closed and looking for a 7C to try.
 

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BB thats a great point. Having them with a wider range of facing, would get them into a new space. I have a 7C Soprano have you found one for Alto as yet ?
 

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Well, the original question is , of course, I think, not answerable, that is if you are not Mr. Yamaha himself.

There is not a particular reason to want to produce a mouthpiece line or even just sell one made by someone else (as so often happened in the history of so many brands). One could also ask why doesn't Yamaha produce a curved soprano or a Bass saxophone or a semicurved soprano or even better why don't they make any " special" finish other than unlacquered?

They must have some reason and possibly the reasons are linked to marketing and strategy.

Yamaha producers good and reliable product , if you ask anybody why they choose Yamaha, a great deal, namely the huge majority, the students and educators would answer that they buy Yamaha because of the reliability.

At least for the saxophones division of their enterprise that what most sales are, into good, reliable instruments. I think that the mouthpiece market is a completely different area of marketing and the fact that there are very few operators running a large scale operation says a lot on why Yamaha never went into this market with any energy whatsoever.

But the reason why is known to them and to them alone.

Of course we all agree that their current mouthpieces are well made and great value for money but I don't think that that was ever put into discussion.-
 
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