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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

A few month ago I bought a Top Hat & Cane alto, pics are posted on a previous post.

As it had been sitting in its case for years it needs an overhaul.

I could take it to my usual tech and let hem do all the work, but I wanted to try and do some work myself.

Got me a starters repair kit, new pads, repair manual, help from you guys and help from the tech. So lets see...

Started to dissasemble it yesterday, take the pads out, clean the pad cups. But it got me thinking where did I get myself into?!?!?! All this bits and pieces, it´s worse than a puzzle.haha! Luckly I labeled everything and got another Buescher to see where it all goes.

Anyways, the sax has all its original snaps and springs, it had original Buescher pads, and the pad cups seemed like new in the inside, like it never had a repad. (See pic) The pads were glued on the outer edge of the cups, from the years there was a green hue build up where the glue was, but managed to get it off.

I will see till where I manage to get by myself, the tech offered to take it over from whatever point I get to.

So wish me luck!!!
 

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Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
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I will see till where I manage to get by myself, the tech offered to take it over from whatever point I get to.
Hopefully you have a helpful and friendly tech, I know some can be a bit cynical about DIY jobs, others can be really encouraging. Do you have the Haynes manual? That's a really good one.

Good luck, you have a great horn there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hopefully you have a helpful and friendly tech, I know some can be a bit cynical about DIY jobs, others can be really encouraging. Do you have the Haynes manual? That's a really good one.

Good luck, you have a great horn there.
Yes I have the haynes manual and it great, full of good tips, I highly recommend it!
 

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Best of luck with your project. Remember that you have to heat the key cups after the pads are snapped in and lightly them clamp still hot to seat them.

I wonder if the "glue" you found was from the final coat of lacquer which would have gone on after the pads were in. If the pads were original, you should see lacquer in the area outside where they contacted the tone holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Best of luck with your project. Remember that you have to heat the key cups after the pads are snapped in and lightly them clamp still hot to seat them.

I wonder if the "glue" you found was from the final coat of lacquer which would have gone on after the pads were in. If the pads were original, you should see lacquer in the area outside where they contacted the tone holes.
Some of the pads have green hue on them aswell, not sure if it is from lacquer or glue... In some of the cups you could see the pad leather folding marks printed on the cups.
 

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The prep work is everything. You might want to have the tone holes leveled by someone with the proper tools and measuring equipment. Its OK to repeat each task until you are comfortable with your technique and results, then do the whole horn. Learning how to fix your blunders is the real lesson. My best work is often what the customer doesn't notice.
 

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Do yourself a huge favor and stop whatever work you're about to do, or are currently doing, on that horn.

That is too high calibre a horn for you to experiment on...get a used YAS-23 to practice your repair skills until you become quite proficient.

You might be fine, but you could also damage your prized vintage horn beyond repair, even if by accident. Better safe than sorry.

- Saxaholic
 

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Do yourself a huge favor and stop whatever work you're about to do, or are currently doing, on that horn.

That is too high calibre a horn for you to experiment on...get a used YAS-23 to practice your repair skills until you become quite proficient.

You might be fine, but you could also damage your prized vintage horn beyond repair, even if by accident. Better safe than sorry.

- Saxaholic
Man, do I agree with that! I guess to some extent it depends on what your priority is.

Do you want a great horn to PLAY?

If so, find a good tech, not just any tech, but someone who really knows what they are doing and knows Bueschers. Then have it overhauled properly. You won't be sorry. I'm still assuming you are a player and want a great horn that is working to its full potential.

All you are likely to do is mess up the horn and make the job even harder for a real tech, who will have to fix all your blunders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just wondering how the project is going. Or did you take saxoholic's advice and take it to a tech?
Hi,

The Job is done! And I must say it doesn´t play too bad IMHO.
I took great care of it, key cups were not bend, no leaks I can see. Only thing middle C is a bit off key.
But I will take it to the tech sometime soon, some springs need tightening, but didn´t dare incase it snapped. So lets see what his verdict is.

Worse case scenario is for him having to do it all over.

Keep you posted!

Regards!
 

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Cool! They tell me it takes a fair amount of expertise to deal with the snap in resos. If you got the repad done with no leaks you did real good.
 

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Cool! They tell me it takes a fair amount of expertise to deal with the snap in resos. If you got the repad done with no leaks you did real good.
At least one tech (mine) thinks that snap on resonator pads are easier.
 

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Hi,

The Job is done! And I must say it doesn´t play too bad IMHO.
I took great care of it, key cups were not bend, no leaks I can see. Only thing middle C is a bit off key.
But I will take it to the tech sometime soon, some springs need tightening, but didn´t dare incase it snapped. So lets see what his verdict is.

Worse case scenario is for him having to do it all over.

Keep you posted!

Regards!
Oh jeez you have shamed me!! I've been working my project for months already.

But then I generally only get part of one day on the weekends to work on it. It's my excuse & I'm sticking to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I must say it was my first time to work on a horn, thank god the horn was in general good state, I think it has been sitting in its case for years. No dings or bends or anything mayor.
So I just did the pads, felts, corks etc...

I took it on because it seemed like a fun thing to do, but it really put my patience to the test!!!
It was a great learning experience but in the end I enjoy playing them more than fixing them, haha!
 

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Hi,

The Job is done! And I must say it doesn´t play too bad IMHO.
I took great care of it, key cups were not bend, no leaks I can see. Only thing middle C is a bit off key.
But I will take it to the tech sometime soon, some springs need tightening, but didn´t dare incase it snapped. So lets see what his verdict is.

Worse case scenario is for him having to do it all over.
Congrats on giving it a go. Now, if I was you, I'd immediately get it to a tech who can put it into good playing condition.
 

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Good job! My "First" was my 1962 Conn 10M. It wasn't as smooth as your job sounded but it was fun. Now I just have to finish the 6M I took apart over a year ago, you might have just motivated me to get it done. Thanks for that and good luck on future projects.
 
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