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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw this offer for a soprano mouthpiece on eBay (apparently a Dukoff clone), but was wondering why they had machined-off a large part of the table, effectively extending the chamber all the way to the bottom of the reed. Not that I plan to buy it, I'm merely curious why someone would do something like that...

Thanks for enlightening me ...

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I don’t know the science behind it, but the Jody Jazz DV is similar in that area. Also, before that, the Runyon Jaguar if I remember correctly.
 

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It makes the chamber bigger but the big thing is it makes machining super easy, fast, and far less expensive than machining a traditionally designed piece. One big challenge of cnc work on a mpc is reaching inside a piece to shape it the way you want. If you take the lid off nothing is in the way. When I see work like that I tend to feel like its a rather cheap shortcut. I think Rovner was one of the first to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It makes the chamber bigger but the big thing is it makes machining super easy, fast, and far less expensive than machining a traditionally designed piece. One big challenge of cnc work on a mpc is reaching inside a piece to shape it the way you want. If you take the lid off nothing is in the way. When I see work like that I tend to feel like its a rather cheap shortcut. I think Rovner was one of the first to do it.
Thanks. I was thinking about the machining advantage too. But doesn't this introduce a lot of uncertainties into the mouthpiece-reed connection? There is only very little area left to seal the reed, also the reed could easily warp into the unsupported area. I can imagine that the characteristics are less reproducible or dependable than with a solid table.
 

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Hardly a new concept. Many have tried. It’s marketed as allowing the reed to better vibrate. I did notice when i had a Jody Jazz that it demanded harder reeds for same tip opening.
 

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The original was the Rovner 'Deep Vee'. Obviously anything like this done to a mouthpiece is designed to increase performance, so you'd have to try it to see if it does. The 'deep vee' takes a mouthpiece truism to the Nth degree - that is, the end of the window where it transitions to the shank bore is a 'sweet spot' where careful blending can yield results. the 'deep vee' just takes a chain saw to it and says 'There.' I've never tried one but some like it and some don't - just like everything else.
 

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Well, I have a Jody Jazz bass MP like that. Fine mouthpiece. I am not convinced about the "vibration" theory since the increased opening is where the table is flat so there shouldn't be any reed vibration there. However, it gives a bigger chamber for a given length and could allow a higher baffle for the same chamber volume. It also allows some compensation for reed swelling and convexity of the back side of the reed. I can't say I notice any aspect of my Jody Jazz piece that I could attribute specifically to the long window, since I don't have any other piece with the same general interior shape and normal window.

Given the cost and the quality of the JJ piece, and the extensive CNC machining inside it, I am pretty certain it's not made that way as a shortcut, but rather for acoustic reasons.
 
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