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Discussion Starter #1
Okay I do not want anyone to steal this idea. (at least not without permission). I have seen this done on low "C" and Bell keys. I have devised a certain design that allows all of the available keys on the saxophone to possess double ribbed construction. Why does nobody do this? It would Drastically decrease leaks preventing keys from bending, and it would really make it easier to press down keys, giving the pad a more spread out seal. Think about it. If nobody else has done this, then finally, one of my inventions has come before the Japanese!
 

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Voldermort lists this as an option for his repair work on his site.

All of the Cannonball baris have this too.

Sorry
 

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Discussion Starter #3
DANG-IT! Is it on all of the keys? I looked at the Cannonball website, and there was only ribbed on the low Bell keys, not all of the keys!
 

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Not sure, its something you could look into. Im sure Ive seen other manufacturers advertise this too though.
 

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ChuBerry47 said:
Maybe I have a shot at beating the japanese, unless they are reading this as we speak.
How much weight is added by these 'improvements'?
 

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Good point, Hakukani. It doesn't take a great leap of logic for Cannonball or anyone who does this (including repairpeople) to put them on every key on the whole horn. I think if it would be beneficial, it probably would have been done already. I would bet that the extra weight isn't going to be worth the stabilization you get.

IMHO, I've never really understood what the benefit is supposed to be of adding extra key arms on keys where the force is coming from the key arm already, and is therefore centered and isn't going to bending the key during usage. Perhaps on like the low D and F on tenor- that I could actually see helping quite a bit. Unless the goal is to make the sax more resistant to getting banged against a chair or dropped in its case or something similar where the key could get bent but not the posts, and even then that is a very small slice of potential damage. Too light a hit- you didn't need them anyways. Too hard a hit, other things besides the keycups have moved anyways.
 

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I add a rib to the RH F#(the key that is activated by the three other RH stack keys) quite often. It adds stability to that critical key that is often impaired by the articulated G# action on bell notes. I have considered it on tenor RH D but have not pursued it yet.
 

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Now that is a very, very good idea Jeff. Especially on horns where the articulating arm is directly attached to the F# key cup. Thanks for sharing!

When I was apprenticing, I had to do a few of the arms on low B, Bb, and C#, and while it was fun to do I never really saw a huge improvement before/after on those key cups.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
hakukani said:
How much weight is added by these 'improvements'?
1.7 pounds at the very most.

And I meant all of the keys, not just a few. All of the keys that your fingers touch, and more!

The Idea is for less bent keys, and better all around sealing, where not as much pressure is apllied to the bell keys.
 

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Except on exceptionally weakly made saxes, I consider flexing of key cup arms a pretty minor issue compared with the flexing of metal in linkages, the squishy materials necessary in linkages, sloppiness in vital pivots, non-rigidity of posts because of the flimsiness of the body, and non-level tone holes.
 
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