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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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17,204 Posts
...They used original Selmer lacquer.
Hmm. I wonder what that actually means. Judging from its response to heat when soldering, my guess is that Selmer has used more than one type of lacquer. And although at least one type may be great for presentation for selling, it certainly is not best for durability when the sax is actually used.
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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17,204 Posts
Postscript....The one negative to relaquering that I have experienced is that the tenon on the neck is refinished and so reduces the friction grip of the tightened neck.
RE-lacquering need not (and should not) have any effect at all on the fit of the neck. Did it become looser because the rough tarnish or gunge was removed?
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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17,204 Posts
..If you want the horn to look like new(no scratches) iy will have to be buffed hard to take them out. This will remove metal.
If you can live with a few scratches ask to have it lightly buffed
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Elaborating... Perhaps it needs highlighting that in order to remove a scratch by buffing, all the surrounding metal must be thinned down until it reaches the thickness of the metal at the bottom of the scratch.

So you can't have it both ways... deep scratches removed and metal thickness preserved. Burnishing may help, to fill a deep scratch with the surrounding metal in a more localised fashion, but that is even more time intensive, and a new, reflective finish may show burnishing bruises unless they are buffed away to the level of the deepest "valley".
 
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