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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Discussion Starter #1
I Did alot of work on the Ferlings in college and never did/used the universal method. But a former student of mine is using it with a good teacher at a college so I was wondering how others use the book. He is doing the finger buster exercises , then the arpegiation of chords and the longer etude in C. All with a met trying to get up to 160 = quarter. I have used the foundation studies in my teaching which covers alot of this but this Universal book looks interesting. I'm going to use it for awhile myself and see what it offers over the Klose/Foundation tech books I have been using. I am just curious what others think of this book and how they structured using it. Thanks K
 

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I am not using it presently but have in the past. I found the "exercises of mechanism" section extremely helpful, and also "detached notes", but then I was just starting out. You may be there already, Keith.
 

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I use the universal method in my teaching. I especially like the opera melodies. Very good for teaching musicality.
 

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Who can argue with 20K posts!!! I'll spend some time with it. It reminds me of the Arban Trpt Method I did in high school. Kind of a one stop book. would you still use the Rubank series or would this replace that? Rubank seems to have alot to offer. K
 

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I like the Rubank, too. But musically, it's kind of ...meh...
 

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I use it with all my kids. The exercises of the mechanism are great and often quite musical as well. There's also plenty of duets in there etc. I think if you can figure out the best most effective stuff from the various methods on the various instruments, Rubank, Klose, Universal, Baermann III, Rose, Trevor Wye, Moyse, etc and then come up with your own blend of them all, it keeps the students working and interested rather than feeling bogged down in the one book.
 

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When I was coming up, the Universal Method was pretty much a standard requirement once you got to the intermediate level and beyond. We started out with the Rubank books, but even the advanced Rubank book only takes you so far. In my junior and senior high school years, if you weren't working out of the Universal Method, you weren't really serious about the saxophone. (That was 35+ years ago).
 

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I use mainly the 60 exercises of mechanism and the 50 exercises from low Bb to F above the staff. These are part of my daily routine. Other parts I use, but not daily, are the Twenty-one Exercises on Detached Notes and the Twenty-seven Exercises for gaining execution. For scales, etc., I prefer the Foundation Studies.
 

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By the way...the Universal Method is available online for free if anyone wants to have a look at it. I posted this link here several years ago and it created a bit of a stir because people were questioning the legality of it. It is officially in the "Public Domain"...(first published in 1908, so no legal copyrights are any longer in effect).

http://www.archive.org/details/universalmethodf00villuoft
 
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