Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2007
Joined
·
467 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
You see alot of mouthpiece guys who are noted for their tweaking of modern Links -- or for making mouthpieces that are basically take-offs on the best of the Links.

I was curious as to whether there is a person or two known for their work on Bergs. I know some people hold Bergs in considerable disregard. Its seems like it would be counterproductive to send one out for tweaking to someone in that camp.

Or is there anyone who buys them, tweaks them and resells them in the manner you see people doing with Links.

I'm talking about a metal Berg for tenor here, probably a 110/2.

Thanks,

Scott
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Scott,
I'd recommend Ed Zentera if you must have one worked on. Ed fixed a tip I had "dinged" on one. I've never had any that I play on messed with, they are exceptionally fine, I guess I've been lucky.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
13,032 Posts
You might have trouble with a metal berg. Most guys are up for the challenge the first time, but remembering how their wrists felt, might not be interested in doing another berg, except for serious $$$.

Let us know how you fare.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member and Forum Contributor
Joined
·
4,379 Posts
If I remember right, Dave Spiegelthal doesn't mind working on stainless steel. Of course he may have changed his mind by now.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
MojoBari does a great job with SS Bergs and I've heard Brian Powell and Erik Greiffenhagen of www.mouthpieceguys.com do great, too......daryl
 

·
The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum
Joined
·
27,650 Posts
I don't know if Ed would be willing to work on any more metal Bergs, he killed his wrists working on mine, but I honestly do not think there is a mouthpiece that plays better than what he did to my Berg. If the DV's are going for $500 then this Berg should be worth the same. Ed just did an incredible job on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,978 Posts
I have just recently given up working on stainless steel mouthpieces. Nothing against Bergs, just the pain of working on SS. I can service more clients if I do not have to rest for several days after working on a SS mouthpiece.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2007
Joined
·
467 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It May Be Bronze. . .

I'm not certain, but the one I may acquire could be one of the newer bronze ones. I have a mouthpiece another guy wants to buy. I offered him a cash price and another price with this berg included.

I'm imagaining that would be easier than stainless steel to work on.

I haven't seen or played it, but another guy told me it doesn't play now. Not sure what the problem is.

I'm pretty happy with what I'm using right now, but I've noticed that many of my favorite players (Pete Christlieb, Lenny, etc.) play Bergs.

So I'm curious.

Thanks for the tips!

Scott
 

·
Mouthpiece Refacer Extraordinaire and Forum Contri
Joined
·
3,406 Posts
Be wary of any SS piece that "doesn't play" in a general sense. While it's not too much (extra) trouble to salvage a really messed up brass or HR mpc, if a SS piece has to go through major surgery, it can be a real nightmare.

I've been ok with taking on stainless work (presently taking care of a couple SS tenor Bergs), though I like to limit myself to straight-forward refacing - not elaborate or major modification. There are maybe some guys out there that are open to performing major SS surgery - more power to them!

Gary's piece, I think was marked 105 but measured an actual .090" or something wildly different. What didn't kill me made me stronger :)

What mostly bugs me about working stainless is it trashes my diamond files and after a few pieces, they have to be replaced. Very time and resource intensive.

All whining aside on my part, if you can get setup into a SS piece that you really love, you are set for a very very very long time.

The best way to handle stainless is to find one that's really close to what you need and just have it finessed if need be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,978 Posts
Try Valtitan files. They seem to hold up well.

The Berg "Bronze" is a very hard alloy too. Almost as hard as SS. Berilium copper (some Sugals) is nasty to work on too.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
774 Posts
We will now have an arm-wrestling contest between the SOTWs famous SS refacers :D
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member.
Joined
·
1,184 Posts
It has nothing to do with strong arms. Did I mention that I use a nuclear-powered arc welder to reface stainless Bergs?
:D
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
MojoBari said:
I have just recently given up working on stainless steel mouthpieces. Nothing against Bergs, just the pain of working on SS. I can service more clients if I do not have to rest for several days after working on a SS mouthpiece.
Mojo, I just missed the delivery of the Berg you just refaced for me. Now I have to wait and get it at the post office Wed.(according to the note they left in my mail-box). I guess I'm responsible for you giving up on Bergs. You did a great job on my 130/2 2 months ago and I can't wait to play the 115/0. Perhaps you could send a letter of authenticity stating this is the last Stainless Berg refaced by MojoBari?:D Seriously, thanks again for doing some real fine work and at a very reasonable rate. You're a stand-up guy. I highly recommend your work to anyone needing mouthpiece work. Honeyboy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,978 Posts
Yes, yours may be the last Berg I worked on. The main thing that bothers me is flattening the table. It's a lot of hard material to take down. Unfortunately, most Bergs need this. The skinny rails are not too bad to work on. Baffle and chamber work can also be a pain. The key is to use grinding points in a high speed rotary tool as much as possible.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
MojoBari said:
Yes, yours may be the last Berg I worked on. The main thing that bothers me is flattening the table. It's a lot of hard material to take down. Unfortunately, most Bergs need this. The skinny rails are not too bad to work on. Baffle and chamber work can also be a pain. The key is to use grinding points in a high speed rotary tool as much as possible.
Well, I took a chance and went to the post office. Luckily I was able to get the piece today. It is much more free blowing and the altissimos are much clearer and pop out better. I think I need to use a harder reed now. I'm going to use it this weekend on a gig. Once again, great job, Mojo.:)
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top