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I'm starting my research in finding a Tenor Sax and something I hadn't thought about before came to mind.

Which horns have the best resale? I'm unsure of which horn I'll purchase, but I do think I want to take resale into consideration.
 

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Any new sax that you buy will be losing between 30 to 50% when you sell it secondhand.

So the better strategy is to buy a secondhand saxophone which needs just minor work and adjustments.

Yamaha and Yanagisawa certainly qualify for being favorably priced when bought Secondhand, generally needing little to no work and retaining a large amount of their purchase cost into reselling value.

BUT, this is also relatively true of more expensive horns. If you buy a secondhand SA 80 (I or II) at a good price (done that a few times) you will sell it at a price not far from the purchase or (if you’ve bought well) even better.

I have bought and sold close to 300 horns now. I have also bought a not playable SA 80 II , had it repaired to perfection and sold it at a good profit to a teacher who sold it again to his pupil ( so there was still value in it).

It’s all in the buying. These days cash speaks harder than anything. I ‘d stay away from brands which require a better knowledge of the market but the same thing can be done with almost any brand because, although it is true that the initial loss may be much larger on a lesser known brand, the person whom will bear most of the loss is the first purchaser.
 

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If you are worried about resale value then you should get a second-hand horn.

As Milandro says, it doesn't really matter which horn it is as long as you don't pay more than the market resale price.
However, well known brands, such as Yamaha, will probably sell easier than obscure brands.
To find the market price - look on eBay. Only consider "sold" prices, not asking prices. Then if you can get a good one for the same or less, you should (in theory) be able to sell it without making a loss.
If you buy an instrument from a shop then expect to pay more, but hopefully there will be less risk.

You should note, however, that "resale value" and "value for money" are not the same thing. You can pay silly money for a collectable horn, and possibly sell it on for the same amount, but you could pay a lot less for one that plays better.
 

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Save your time and your money. If resale is influencing your choice, you are better off not buying. Better to buy the horn you want, than to buy the one you want to sell.
 

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Milandro and Nigeld raise good points. If you are thinking of buying a horn or horns to try, and then sell if you don't like it (or want to try a different one), which is what I did, the important thing is 1) that you pay the used market price or less when buying it, and 2) that it does not require significant (expensive) repairs. This means that you should buy a used horn in good playing condition. The major brands (esp. Yamaha) will tend to be quicker/easier to sell than more obscure ones, but the obscure ones may be better values.

I bought a series of "good value" used tenors to try (I think all were under $1000), knowing that I could sell them for about what I paid for them if I didn't like them. It worked well except for the one (ebay) horn that needed an overhaul - I took a big loss on that one.

Bottom line on "researching" horns, is that you can narrow down which ones you want to check out, but there is no substitute for playing them.
 

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That's not the question to ask if you are intending to play the saxophone, rather than flip horns.

The question is not which horn has the best resale value, but rather which horn plays best for you!

(Dr G already made this point, but it's worth repeating)
 

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well, there are also perfectly good reasons to ask such question like for example a parent buying a horn for a son or daughter whom, he is not sure, is going to pursue this for a very long time.

JL, you mention the word flipper meaning a saxophone buyer/seller in a pejorative way and I honestly don’t understand it.
 

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“Flip” - a four letter word describing an action that tends to benefit only one person. Does that sound perjorative, or is it a statement of fact? :bluewink:

Keep an open mind when doing your crossword puzzles.
 

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... sounds about right. Which will prompt a lengthy defence/dissertation
From a certain wounded party.

The singular goal of flipping is to make money. By definition.
 

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And yes, pretend you are going to try to find a sax you will want to keep.

Then resale is irrelevant.

Just sayin.
 

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And yes, pretend you are going to try to find a sax you will want to keep.

Then resale is irrelevant.

Just sayin.
+1 I paid way more than market value for my c-soprano and then the same again for a complete repad - overhaul - regulation so that it is in almost factory new condition and it would probably be the last horn I sell, it is just such a fine instrument
 

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I actually don't think resale value is completely irrelevant. I can understand why it would matter to some people. I mean, for example, if one is buying via internet, and they have no ability to get their hands on a model and playtest it themselves, and they aren't all that experienced in purchasing a new-to-them horn.....it would give SOME peace of mind to know if they took a shot and it ultimately didn't float their boat.....they wouldn't get hosed on selling it.

To me... a "Flip" is something quite different..because a Flip is a purchase with the intent to resell (usually for a profit, oftentimes with minimal investment put into servicing/repair).

I interpreted the OP's question as just wanting to consider covering his bases....
 

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Have to agree with some of the folks, if you are buying with the potential to resell then don't buy new. BUT, I would say Yanagisawa probably resells the best, followed by Yamaha and Selmer (those two I say resell pretty similar). I give Yanagisawa the upper hand because there doesn't seem to be as many used in the market (supply and demand). Good luck!

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The singular goal of any trade is to make money. The upside are the many thanks received from the people whom bought my horns. Generally 30 to 50% cheaper than at a shop.
 

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Funny, no one refers to WalMart or Target as flippers (as used in the pejorative).

Flippers are entrepreneurs.
 

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I think that resale value is the last thing you should worry about when you buy used. Unless you are in the business of flipping horns, and it isn't a bad thing if you are, then you should look for playability and sound over appearance and brand. If it is a great horn for you and you play it a lot you will spend money periodically on upkeep and repairs that you won't recoup when you sell it anyway.
This is just my opinion, but I've experienced it with every sax I've owned. I am about to cross the threshold into the Land Of Money I Won't See Again with my King tenor but it's ok because I love it and can't see myself parting with it any time soon.
 

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The singular goal of any trade is to make money. The upside are the many thanks received from the people whom bought my horns. Generally 30 to 50% cheaper than at a shop.
Trade or sale?
 
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