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Any suggestions ?
I personally don’t know any repairer that would take on one willingly. My tech in Wellington NZ has grappled with a couple but it’s not a job he relishes. Do check out S Howard’s review of one on his bench if you haven’t already and you’ll see the pitfalls of its mechanics. And yes I do have one and it doesn’t get played too often. Nice enough horn but not one I’d want to be on full time. It’s on permanent loan to me from a classical clarinetist who bought it from the original owner in Italy. Original case mouthpiece neck strap etc
If there is a tech out there you’ll probably find them through SOTW leads and I’m sorry I can’t be helpful other than to offer my personal experience with one.
 

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I had one for a while, and of course couldn't resist the temptation to have a quick look under the bonnet (so to speak), and yes... mongrels to work on is an apt description. Mainly because of the springy springs that spring off and bounce away just from being looked at, plus whatever that plastic is, robust it aint. Nor does it bend... care, caution, and no second chances. Beautiful looking things though, and actually sound pretty good too. Not that you'd wanna take one to a gig...
B.S.
 

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The acrylic plastic these are made of is well passed their usual lifetime already. Like the Brilhart mouthpieces, these are not worth investing on, except for sentimental value. Graftons look nice in a display case. Sorry, I don't know anyone that would want to or could do a good job repairing these.
 

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I like a real challenge and would love to work on a grafton. I know that it would require more hours than most are willing to pay for. Therefor I'm looking for a bargain grafton that I can take my time with.

I'd never do an overhaul on a grafton for a customer at a fixed price. Only at an hourly rate.
I think that most techs that would like to work on a grafton would do the same.

I'm sure there are more techs in Europe that would like to work on your sax.
 

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The acrylic plastic these are made of is well passed their usual lifetime already. Like the Brilhart mouthpieces, these are not worth investing on, except for sentimental value. Graftons look nice in a display case. Sorry, I don't know anyone that would want to or could do a good job repairing these.
Amen - the issue of acrylic lifetime is important here. However robust the horns might have been when new, their material is now brittle. Any repair tech would be fighting aged material as well as inherent idiosyncrasies.
 

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Time to put it to rest. Put it on display (away from sunlight!) and declare victory.

I've tried to repair mechanical things made of embrittled plastic. Soon as you glue one broken area another breaks. There's no there, there. You always want to go back and anchor your repair to sound material - but there isn't any sound material. Just give it up.
 

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It CAN be done, the issue is, every repairer (myself included) would likely have to devise their own way of doing it. I have removed the upper stack on one before and replaced a couple pads...the engineering CONCEPT, while unusual, is not illogical.. IOW a tech with a good sense of mechanics, when presented with one of these, can deduce how to attack it.

The issue is...TIME, and as the SH review notes.....the likelihood that at the end of the day, it just isn't going to be as tightened-up, all i's dotted, etc....job as a conventional horn would be, simply due to the fact that the mechanism design isn't really made to be pin-point precise as far as key play, pad sealing, and action.

But one can be made to play....with time....
 

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It seems like I've seen other manufacturers recently introduce plastic saxes that were not all that expensive. It might be cheaper to buy a new one if you just want to play one. If you just want to restore a bit of history that's another thing.
 

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One manufacturer only produced a plastic saxophone, Vibratosax, no other one, after the disappearance of Grafton (a vERY different saxophone, by the way!

But I don’t think the “ aim “ is the nature of the material but the legend that the Grafton represents.
Charlie Parker , Ornette Coleman and David Bowie played these and were represented on pictures driving this horn to the status of an Icon, a status that the vibratos will never be able to achieve for the simple lack of legends playing it.

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I would think an aesthetic overhaul most appropriate, as others have indicated the material is past it’s expiration date. As I know from experience, all things made of plastic of any kind will eventually become brittle and can fail at any time. Rebuilding one to be played is just inviting catastrophic failure and destruction of the instrument. If you want to hear one played, buy some old vinyl and enjoy.
 

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One manufacturer only produced a plastic saxophone, Vibratosax, no other one, after the disappearance of Grafton (a vERY different saxophone, by the way!
Agreed, the Vibratosax is absolutely not a serious, pro sax. Joe McPhee plays one and loves it, but he'd sound good on anything. For me it's almost impossible to play at all as the plastic is very soft and if you press a key with any pressure it will bend the pad and create leaks all over the place.

Here's a cool video a friend of mine, André Roligheten, made with one....
 
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