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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious (read: bored), Where or what is the origin of the * symbol for tip openings? When and why did it become widely used?
 

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google is your friend.

from the online etymological dictionary:

1382, from L.L. asteriscus, from Gk. asterikos "little star," dim. of aster "star" (see star). The meaning "figure used in printing and writing to indicate footnote, omission, etc." first recorded 1612.
 

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It was originally a plus sign. But the worker who was responsible for stamping it could never get it lined up straight. To save his job, he convinced the company to make it an asterisk because no one can tell if an asterisk is straight.

Well, it could be true.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #4
So there's a footnote on my mp? Is that a subtone? How do I play that? ;)

Really... I meant, why is it a C, C*, D, D*, etc. rather than a "1/2"?
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #5
retread said:
It was originally a plus sign. But the worker who was responsible for stamping it could never get it lined up straight. To save his job, he convinced the company to make it an asterisk because no one can tell if an asterisk is straight.

Well, it could be true.

This is more convincing :twisted:
 

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tjontheroad said:
So there's a footnote on my mp? Is that a subtone? How do I play that? ;)

Really... I meant, why is it a C, C*, D, D*, etc. rather than a "1/2"?
Well, gee, I just answered the question you asked.<insert Jack Benny look>
I am, after all, a public school teacher.
 

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tjontheroad said:
This is more convincing :twisted:
Yeah.. Or it's just because the "+" symbol doesn't show up very good when engraved with a punch. That sounds convincing too, but it's just as much speculation as the alignment theory. ;)
 

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WHy not call a C a C, a C* a D. Why make a 'tweener'?
 

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Mouthpiece Refacer Extraordinaire and Forum Contri
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I thought maybe it had something to do with one lettered swear words.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #10
Speculations from another thread

Stars...

AdrianMolina said:
I could be wrong, but....

Wasn't the 4**** model named such, because, presviously, the Otto Link mpcs were only available in "number" facings like 2,3,4,5, but then Link introduced the "Star" facing nomenclature, to signify a facing which is between a number, ie.., 2, 2* , 3, 3*, 4, 4*, 5, 5*, four NEW "star" sizes, hence the "4****" model.

Look at the old ads.

If it were for named for four sax stars, then it would be probably be called "Four Stars" or "Four Star", with the word STAR write n out, right?, but the named stamped on the mpc is 4****.

Sometimes, if we sit and think too much about something, we can think of all kinds of complicated answers to a question, when the answer is right in front of our nose.

my 2 cents
 

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hakukani said:
WHy not call a C a C, a C* a D. Why make a 'tweener'.
I figure some mouthpiece maker did just start with sizes A, B, C, D, etc... But then some other mouthpiece maker started making in between sizes for a more "custom sax-playing experiance". Thus the "*" sizes were born.

Hey, that sounds convincing too. Maybe I can explain everything with uninformed but reasonable theories if I just apply myself more. Others have done it successfully. Why not me too? :D
 

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Enviroguy said:
Hey, that sounds convincing too. Maybe I can explain everything with uninformed but reasonable theories if I just apply myself more. Others have done it successfully. Why not me too? :D
I believe this is called truthiness:

 

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I have an old Link ad somewhere. It says that the star facings had the same facing length as the number indicates but with a more open tip.
So I understand that at that time (60s-70s) the star facings indicated short facings. For Link at least.
Comments?
 

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rini said:
I have an old Link ad somewhere. It says that the star facings had the same facing length as the number indicates but with a more open tip.
So I understand that at that time (60s-70s) the star facings indicated short facings. For Link at least.
Comments?
Yes! Same facing length and a more open tip. The reed lenght doesn't change :) and this approach is my favourite.
In some mouthpieces you can also see... X** (a double star, e.g. 7**) to indicate a very fine work on the mouthpiece opening.

Stan
 

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I believe the on the old Brilharts an asterisk indicated a shorter facing length rather than a wider tip opening - somebody correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Enviroguy said:
it's just as much speculation as the alignment theory. ;)
Speculation? SPECULATION? I'll have you know I learned this from a guy whose wife was second cousin to someone who once had a beer with someone who knew the name of an actual mouthpiece maker. Speculation, indeed. Humph.
 

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stefank said:
I believe the on the old Brilharts an asterisk indicated a shorter facing length rather than a wider tip opening - somebody correct me if I'm wrong.
That's also my understanding.
 
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