Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,369 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Like these:



Ferree's have a set for $96 and there are Votaw's for $78. Still expensive... :crybaby:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,369 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I was reading some posts on sotw about these, and the common opinion seems to be if you do everything else right, you don't really need these.

I got Stephen Howard's Haynes Saxophone Manual and they are mentioned as an essential tool, that's why I was considering getting a set...

Hmmmm...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician.
Joined
·
3,196 Posts
You can make a set. spring shim steel sheet - or something like that - is what we used. It's flat and flexible so you just need to snip a piece and file to shape. (Those minidrills come in handy!!!)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,042 Posts
A time saver if you're working really fast I suppose- but to do a decent job you're still going to have to level the pad after getting an initial ball park with those. If you don't, the back of the pad is going to be up for sure.

For the kind of volume you're liable to be doing a butter knife or MusicMedic pad slick (and a decent leak light) will work just fine. Skip the slicks.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,369 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Alright, that's great I couldn't justify spending this much on them.

I may attempt to make my own though. Seems like a fun project.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,042 Posts
Agreed.

It's undeniably true that folks- not including professional techs clearly- really do try to use them as as a full set of some kind of 360 degree pad slicks. The end result is a perfectly aligned (or at least aligned) pad surface for a tone hole that's whatever the thickness of the slick is taller than the tone holes you actually have on your horn...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,369 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I just read the section of the book on replacing pads again, Stephen Howard uses one of these to set a pad correctly into its cup. He also mentions you can use one of these flat ones instead.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
If you're working on the 'Level cup to level tone hole with level pad' principle, pad setting plates are a fast and efficient way of seating pads - but you really do have to have a level cup and tone hole.
A lot of the problems that arise from using these plates is that some people think that the tool guarantees an instant pad seat. It doesn't - you still have to use your eye to work the pad.

You can do much the same job with a solid plate - it's just more fiddly.

You can make your own, but you'll probably find that it's not worth the time and hassle. A good source of metal is decorator's spatulas - look for the ones that have blades that aren't tapered in thickness.
You'll have to grind them though - they're almost impossible to cut without distorting the metal and they don't drill easily.

Regards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
This thread really demonstrates that repairmen all do it a little different and still get good results. Personally I'm still using the cake spatula I bought in 1977! Whatever floats your boat and gets the job done!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
The end result is a perfectly aligned (or at least aligned) pad surface for a tone hole that's whatever the thickness of the slick is taller than the tone holes you actually have on your horn...
How can the results of introducing a slick between pad and tone hole be other than as pointed out by Henry D ?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
How can the results of introducing a slick between pad and tone hole be other than as pointed out by Henry D ?
Depends how you use it.
If the key cup is flat and the tone hole is level, you'll want the pad to be flat - so a slick can serve as an iron. After that it's about moving the pad in the cup to take up any discrepancies.
There are two common approaches - either manipulate the pad or manipulate the key. I prefer the latter, but there are times when moving the pad is the only sensible option.
In the strictest sense of the the meaning, setting a pad only takes place when the pad is in contact with the tone hole - anything else is a means of adjusting the pad in preparation for this final step.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Depends how you use it.
Thank you for your explanation. I did buy a set of slicks a while ago but couldn't really see the benefits when I tried using them. Maybe I should give it another go. I would appreciate some advice about a tool I've seen for manipulating key cups. I suppose I'd better start a new thread to do that.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
Thank you for your explanation. I did buy a set of slicks a while ago but couldn't really see the benefits when I tried using them. Maybe I should give it another go. I would appreciate some advice about a tool I've seen for manipulating key cups. I suppose I'd better start a new thread to do that.
You might well find that another method of pad seating suits you better - all that really matters is the end result.
On a MkVI tenor I have on the bench at the moment I've used a couple of different methods - over a period of time you get an eye for what technique is the most appropriate.

Regards,
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
I've never had or used them.

But I reckon they're pretty cheap. I couldn't make one for $10.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top