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What is a good thing to do when you can't practice for a couple days in a row in order to keep up good practicing habits?
 

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It is usually a good idea to take your mind off practicing altogether when you are unable to play your instrument. Even if you play another instrument, like piano, it is a good idea to take a break every now and then. I know that feeling of wanting to shed 7 days a week, but my mind becomes exausted if I try to accomplish more than I can mentally handle at any given time.

When you aren't able to practice, listen to CDs, meditate, watch TV, do whatever you want. Then when you start practicing again, the mind is more refreshed.
 

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sometimes (a lot of times actually) i usually listen to aebersold tracks on my ipod, while i try to improvise scat song. The phillosophy is, if i can sing, i can play.
 

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I have a crappy 0.50c bamboo flute (which is just a hollow tube 70cm long). When I can't practice or am away from my sax for a while, i carry it around and practice my fingering on it. i don't blow into it or anything, I just carry it around and practice with my fingers.

I've actually memorised quite a few licks using this method (on the train to and from work), plus I had a lovely chat with a girl yesterday after she asked me what the hell i was doing!
 

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When I cant practice I come here. Good ol' SOTW... actually even if I can practice I'll stop by here. Not really having that many responsibilities this summer due to an injury has given me alot of free time.
 

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if you need work on your tonguing (like me) then I usually do some tongue exercises...

An example of one is:
Saying Lea-Der over and over again, while concentrating on pronunciation the consonants. Do this faster and faster, but with accuracy.
 

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Sing what you would have wanted to practice. Or visualize yourself playing what you would have practiced, fingering, phrasing, sound and all. This is not a new technique. The pianist Walter Gieseking learned most of his repertoire this way before even touching the keyboard. Glenn Gould would sit alone somewhere before a concert and play the entire performance in his mind this way. The imagination is the musicians most important tool.

David
 
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