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Then he needs to learn new things. You can't have played everything.
Yes, this is a good answer for a possible solution to the problem; but my question is: at what stage does it appear - and does not go away. I heard something similar in relation to Bill Evans.
 

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Yes, this is a good answer for a possible solution to the problem; but my question is: at what stage does it appear - and does not go away. I heard something similar in relation to Bill Evans.
There is no answer to this question. Some player's play the same old stuff they learned when they were 20 without much of a difference over the years. Some players like Stan Getz seemed to be always inventing and coming up with new material until the end. It really depends on the person and how creative and imaginative they are....... It also has to do with how courageous and spontaneous a player is......
 

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There are always things to learn, but having the energy to keep pushing ourselves is not always easy. My Grandmother always used to say "when you stop learning you stop living".
 

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At what point does incontinence become a problem for the aging musician?




Depends.
 

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At what point does incontinence become a problem for the aging musician?




Depends.
Wow, took me a second. But wow.

And I think we might be dealing with a language barrier from the OP. Because that should have gotten a similar response as this. Also the rest of the words in the thread.....
 

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Yes, c'mon folks.....likely OP's first language isn't English.
But we all get the gist of the question.

How many different languages do y'all N. Americans speak ?

Like Neff says, players do both. I have seen players who are still dialed in and creative into their 80's...and I have seen pros who clearly had packed it in a while ago and were just resting on their laurels.

Sadly, in too many instances the audience failed to recognize the beauty/significance of the former, and the unfortunateness of the latter.
 

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One of my mentors said... "Remember this feeling. This feeling is forever." You just have to keep working and not let it get you down!
 

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I mean, when age comes, and to improviser becomes bored listening to himself.
If you're asking for advice about your own playing I would say "play less". Consider playing one chorus and getting off. (The other musicians will be astonished, especially if they are rabbiting on for dozens of choruses.)

If you're asking about prominent musicians, honestly I have not noticed a lot of them who failed to continue creating. What I have noticed in many prominent jazz musicians' work is that they play less, more sparely, fewer notes, more space, whatever term you want to use, as they age. Some writers put this down to "the deterioration of age (and often, bad habits)" but I believe that in most cases this has actually been an artistic decision.

Part of the reason I think that people like Lester Young, Dexter Gordon, et al. have played more and more sparingly as they got older is that I am finding I do the exact same; yet I know I am not suffering serious deterioration with age or bad chemical habits. In my case (to the extent you can compare me to the recognized greats - I'm fearful of even putting myself in the same sentence as them, but I hope y'all will forgive me) I am finding myself making conscious decisions to play fewer notes for fewer choruses but trying to make them mean more.

Some people continue in much the same vein of their youth their entire lives; others make changes. Two examples of the latter are of course Miles Davis, that everyone knows about, and James Pellerite the prominent classical flutist. A couple decades ago, after a lengthy and celebrated career as a classical flutist, Pellerite largely gave up playing that instrument and that music; began a very serious study of the American Indian flute and its music (this is an end blown flute or a variant of the well-known recorder, basically), and now performs at a high level on that instrument and that repertoire.

A couple other examples of people who played rather differently later in life would be Pee Wee Russell (check out his album with tunes from Monk, for example) and Bud Freeman (check out his album "The Real Bud Freeman" where he plays with a fascinating style that's kind of a combination of the Austin High trad jazz and hard-bop tenor styles, on a bunch of later bebop-era standards).

As I have gotten older I am really finding myself interested in the later-life work of a number of artists and here are some examples where a youngster might think "deterioration of age" and an older person might think "the results of a lifetime of experience".

the above albums
Pete Brown - From the Heart
Billie Holiday - Lady in Satin - what she could do with limited equipment - all the Whitney-Houston-copy bellowers should listen to this about 100 hours straight, after which they will just hang it up
Late Prez
Dex on the Round Midnight soundtrack
the late Louis Armstrong albums - Music of W C Handy; Armstrong/Ellington; Let's Do It; etc.
The later Miles stuff
Coleman Hawkins' last few albums
Willie Nelson - Stardust

And so on.
 

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Well, I may not be known for the fertility of my invention, nor for my sparkling technique, or compelling tone, but ever since my youth I have been known for my flatulence, in volume, sound level, strength, and persistence.

I have not noticed any diminution or, even, increase in my powers, with advancing age. This is something that's always been with me, and I expect it always will; I might miss it if it were to go. (Or not. My wife, on the other hand, would have a different opinion. Now that the dog's died, I can't even blame it on the dog any more.)
 

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Start by playing different rhythms than usual, listen to the drum solo and pick 2, and make that the basis for your own solo. Build on and develop the rhythms and don't worry so much about what notes.

At what point does flatulence become a problem for the aging musician?
When ff also means double farte.
 

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Charlie Parker, arguably the greatest improviser in history, repeated himself at times. It's probably impossible not to. Everyone tries to create something new in the moment, but we all eventually develop our own signature vocabulary of licks and tricks.

The important thing, IMHO, is to continue learning, developing, and enjoying our wonderful art form. Listen to new music with new ears, practice new things, and trust that it will come out in your playing.
 

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Surround yourself with very creative musicians and play off of what you hear. Add to the "spontaneous" musical conversation. Inspired musicians can inspire other members of a group of musicians. Play-alongs won't follow you, so play with live musicians as often as possible even if it's just a piano player or guitar player. If you're good with outlining harmony jam with a drummer.
 
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