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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been playing on the same 2.5 Fibracell, since the end of February. It's been sounding great, the whole time, but this week I started having trouble blowing my palm key notes. My first thought was, "Oh damn, I've developed a leak somewhere." But just for the heck of it, I took out a new 2.5 and slapped it onto the Tone Edge.....voila....problem solved!
I always wondered how I would know when the old Fibracell was finally shot. I guess I found out!
How do you guys judge when a Fibracell is past its prime?
 

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I was lucky. Mine made it through the gig before it failed.

Slapped it on the next night, and the horn would barely make a sound.
Yeah, it took a minute to diagnose the problem.
Played great last night ... so ... could be anything.

Happily, they are cheap.
 

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I bought a yamaha venova (weird saxophone recorder thing, uses a soprano mouthpiece) and it came with a synthetic reed, not sure if it was fibracell, not branded, but similar in appearance and I had the same experience as above except mine seemed to not want to do anything in the extreme upper or lower registers before it just right out stopped playing. Figured I'd try it since it came with it, but switched back to cane after that.

Thanks!
Kristy
 

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At least they fixed the de-lamination thing. I was playing a gig about 10 or 15 years ago when my horn just stopped playing. When I took the reed off, the plastic backing was curled up against the baffle and completely blocking the airflow. That was embarrassing.
 

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saxophone, flutes and lil' bit of clarinet
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I can usually tell when Altissimo notes don’t come out strongly. That, and looking at the back of the reed you’ll see some cracks starting to form.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I can usually tell when Altissimo notes don’t come out strongly. That, and looking at the back of the reed you’ll see some cracks starting to form.
Sounds like what I experienced.
 

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To me its like any other reed but takes a lot longer - mainly it just gets softer and begins to aggravate me so I try to remember to get another one soon. And thanks for reminding me because I need to do that right now. Later.
 

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As far as the delaminaion goes, I've had that happen, too; but not to the extent that my horn wouldn't play. There is a clear, thin, sticky sheet that forms the whole backside of the reed and I've had that sheet peel off of several Fibracell reeds, over time. However, I replaced it with a length of clear Scotch tape, trimmed off the side-overhang, and the reed continued to play well. But when they are done, they are DONE.

And I've found a lack of consistency among the several that I've owned. Some play great, most are lacking in response. It is the great ones that keep me on-board. I just make sure to keep a couple extras in my cases for those time when they die. DAVE
 

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I mustn’t have played mine enough yet.
I’ve had one on the go (on and off) for over a year and it still plays pretty well.
It does feel like a half strength softer though.
I wish my Legere classic would soften a bit, still feels like a 2 by 4 after months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
To me its like any other reed but takes a lot longer - mainly it just gets softer and begins to aggravate me so I try to remember to get another one soon. And thanks for reminding me because I need to do that right now. Later.
You're welcome. I make it a habit to buy one, as soon as I start using the new one in my case.
 

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I LOVE my Fibra cells, I play 3 or 4 nights a week on mine & they do last a very long time

As to the main question, I seem to start getting "hints" on notes that have the greatest back pressure, such as middle D & E. They seems to be "thin" and eventually begin to fail on these note. If not paid attention to, they can suddenly die as if shot off the horse.
 

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I mustn’t have played mine enough yet.
I’ve had one on the go (on and off) for over a year and it still plays pretty well.
It does feel like a half strength softer though.
I wish my Legere classic would soften a bit, still feels like a 2 by 4 after months.
Bring water in a cup to a boil. Dip the playing end of the reed in for about 1/2 second. Let the reed cool a bit and then try it. If still too strong, repeat the process. I have used this practice to soften Legere's up to about 1/2 too hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I LOVE my Fibra cells, I play 3 or 4 nights a week on mine & they do last a very long time

As to the main question, I seem to start getting "hints" on notes that have the greatest back pressure, such as middle D & E. They seems to be "thin" and eventually begin to fail on these note. If not paid attention to, they can suddenly die as if shot off the horse.
Good observation, Because! Come to think of it, my middle D had been starting to really suck, lately, after having gotten it to a pretty decent sounding note, prior to that. I didn't really equate that the reed was possibly gonzo, till the palm keys started giving my big troubles.
 

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Bring water in a cup to a boil. Dip the playing end of the reed in for about 1/2 second. Let the reed cool a bit and then try it. If still too strong, repeat the process. I have used this practice to soften Legere's up to about 1/2 too hard.
Thanks for the information.
I’ll give it a try when I get it out next time.
 

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Bring water in a cup to a boil. Dip the playing end of the reed in for about 1/2 second. Let the reed cool a bit and then try it. If still too strong, repeat the process. I have used this practice to soften Legere's up to about 1/2 too hard.
Well I gave it a try and it worked out really well.
I feel I lowered the strength by around a quarter which is just what I needed.
Thanks again for the tip.
 

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Bring water in a cup to a boil. Dip the playing end of the reed in for about 1/2 second. Let the reed cool a bit and then try it. If still too strong, repeat the process. I have used this practice to soften Legere's up to about 1/2 too hard.
This is an interesting tip and I definitely will try it. In my view its better than sanding (if it works) because the reed is not thinned and the exterior coatings are not removed.
 

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Post deleted. The reed in question was not recent - it was the first generation of the 'Premier' series and I actually bought it about two years ago when I was playing another mouthpiece. When I got the Level Air, my #2 1/2s felt a little soft so I pulled it out of the reed drawer and started using the 'new' #3 on the last two or three jobs.

I had contacted the manufacturer and they offered to replace it, but when I was getting ready to pack it up and send it, it started to come to me what really happened - basically I got it mixed up with some more recent Fibracell purchases on Amazon. So I notified them of what happened and I'm keeping the reed although I did just order a new one.

Phew! I hate mix-ups but they happen. I'm buying reeds for sop, alt, ten and bar, Fibracell except cane on tenor, three or four times a year, and I deleted a bunch of older orders on Amazon which included the #3 reed. I just wanted to correct the record on the baritone Fibracell that is probably from the first generation.
 
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