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What and how is Michael Brecker doing at 2:30 mins in this video ?
Is that Multiphonics?
Delta City Blues
 

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That is freakin awesome! Thanks for the find. It certainly sounds like multiphonics with a bit of growl added for a cool feel. Too bad they didn't show his hands then. Brecker rocks!
 

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If you're looking for a shortcut, a number of compositions by Christian Lauba contain very explicit instructions on how to acheive similar effects. The aptly named piece "Hard" comes immediatly to mind. It's still far from trivial to produce some of these multiphonics--you need enough air to blow up skirts in the front row and the vibrations could very well loosen your bowels. Happy tone splitting!
 

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It's a multiphoncs. Play a low Bb with both the low Eb and low C pinky keys depressed. Now try the same position with low C# and low Bb. You're creating a small vent between the lower and upper parts of the horn and getting "tone clusters."

(Post 1,000. Woo hoo, I didn't waste it on sarcasm).
 

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Damn. Am I "out-of-the-loop" or what? Didn't take me long to put everything together after flipping through few YouTube tributes. I imagine Gabriel has gotten himself schooled and probably hung up his horn by now.
That makes me really sad. I've been putting off transcibing his solos for a long time, but now...

Going through all those videos--he's been playing so many of those lines for decades. Granted, he's expanded his vocabulary, but there's always been that base material--and it's killer base material. Every improvising musician relies on that "generic material" that he or she can just play in the wink of an eye. Watching Mike over the years really drives home that point that David Baker makes about great players having awesome generic material. Even the multiphonics have been integrated into these well worn lines. It's not just the technique that's impressive, but the creativity that went into building such incredible vocabulatry from the ground level!
It makes me question the productiveness of beating to death all those Da-Vid-Ba-Ker-Be-Bop lines =~)
 

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Damn. Am I "out-of-the-loop" or what? Didn't take me long to put everything together after flipping through few YouTube tributes. I imagine Gabriel has gotten himself schooled and probably hung up his horn by now.
That makes me really sad. I've been putting off transcibing his solos for a long time, but now...

Going through all those videos--he's been playing so many of those lines for decades. Granted, he's expanded his vocabulary, but there's always been that base material--and it's killer base material. Every improvising musician relies on that "generic material" that he or she can just play in the wink of an eye. Watching Mike over the years really drives home that point that David Baker makes about great players having awesome generic material. Even the multiphonics have been integrated into these well worn lines. It's not just the technique that's impressive, but the creativity that went into building such incredible vocabulatry from the ground level!
It makes me question the productiveness of beating to death all those Da-Vid-Ba-Ker-Be-Bop lines =~)
 

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Wow! thanks for pointing this video out. I have a TV connected to my computer as monitor for editing video. I never thought of sliding the YouTube window over to it. Now I can type and watch at the same time!

Talk about being schooled. There's a lesson there about keeping your horn in top shape, too!
 

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Thank You for sharing that! Wow!...I saw him do that when he started Delta City Blues at the Cafe' Malono in Nashville Nov 98. That just brought back such a great memory. The entire crowd, who were made up of the best musicians in town were dumbfounded. He spoke to us during the break, before his next performance...very humble & friendly. I'm really going to miss him, but he lives on in this video!
 

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At 2:30 Mike is fingering a middle E (1,2,&3 in the left hand and 1&2 in the right) and adding the side Bb and Octave key. This is for the High F multiphonic. For the High F# multi his fingering is 1&3 in the left hand, 1&3 in the right hand, low C, low Bb, and octave key.
 

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carl coan said:
At 2:30 Mike is fingering a middle E (1,2,&3 in the left hand and 1&2 in the right) and adding the side Bb and Octave key. This is for the High F multiphonic. For the High F# multi his fingering is 1&3 in the left hand, 1&3 in the right hand, low C, low Bb, and octave key.

Nice to see you on here dude. You are the Brecker expert!

(I have your transcription books:) )
 
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