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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
JALCO are currently touring the UK with a tour celebrating the 75th anniversary of Blue Note. I was privileged enough to get back stage with my students, one of whom is a 14 year old lad who is going to be some player when he grows up.

I've posted a full blog on my website here, (http://cambridgesaxophone.com/wp/wynton-marsalis-chats-cambridge-saxophone-students/)

What surprised me the most was Wynton's instance that young students should study the music or Ornette Coleman! I hoped he would be impressed that a 14 year old kid was willing to transcribe Stan Getz, Lester Young and Charlie Parker - I think he was a bit but he emphasised the importance of understanding the WHOLE of the jazz spectrum, (well as far as Wynton's spectrum stretches ;) )

The gig was great and I was thrilled that a full house came to the Corn Exchange that night.
 

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JALCO are currently touring the UK with a tour celebrating the 75th anniversary of Blue Note. I was privileged enough to get back stage with my students, one of whom is a 14 year old lad who is going to be some player when he grows up.

I've posted a full blog on my website here, (http://cambridgesaxophone.com/wp/wynton-marsalis-chats-cambridge-saxophone-students/)

What surprised me the most was Wynton's instance that young students should study the music or Ornette Coleman! I hoped he would be impressed that a 14 year old kid was willing to transcribe Stan Getz, Lester Young and Charlie Parker - I think he was a bit but he emphasised the importance of understanding the WHOLE of the jazz spectrum, (well as far as Wynton's spectrum stretches ;) )

The gig was great and I was thrilled that a full house came to the Corn Exchange that night.
This is a shocker to me hearing that Wynton has opened his ears over the years. Ornette is a true giant.
 

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When Wynton was 18 he played a lot like Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw. He had seriously studied the music of and personally with Clark Terry. He spoke of and listened to Ornette. This isn't a new development for him. There is a lot of talk about Wynton which is not based in fact.
 

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When Wynton was 18 he played a lot like Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw. He had seriously studied the music of and personally with Clark Terry. He spoke of and listened to Ornette. This isn't a new development for him. There is a lot of talk about Wynton which is not based in fact.
+ 1 - AGreed
 

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I can understand that some of his best friends might be outside players, but it's still surprising to those who have only listened to hear him give such praise to Ornette. His activities in Jazz at Lincoln Center and his canonization of the more mainstream tendencies in the music would lead someone to believe otherwise. And if Woody Shaw and Freddie Hubbard are being equated with Ornette here, then we simply have different ideas of the music. Thanks again to the OP for what is a very interesting anecdote.
 

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If I am not mistaken Freddie Hubbard recorded with Ornette, Dolphy, and John Coltrane. Woody was a part of the so-called "free jazz' movement and played in the "free" band Circle with Chick Correa. The music is wide as are the players.
 

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The discipline of a Charlie Parker and the free wheeling blues of Ornette. My favorite first records were Bird at St. Nicks , Cannonballs Mercy, Mercy, Mercy and Ornette's Science Fiction.
It's still kind of funny he will talk about all that cutting edge music and make his millions with a repertory band playing old swing stuff.
 

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If I am not mistaken Freddie Hubbard recorded with Ornette, Dolphy, and John Coltrane. Woody was a part of the so-called "free jazz' movement and played in the "free" band Circle with Chick Correa. The music is wide as are the players.
I thought Circle was Braxton, Corea, Holland, and Altschul. When did Shaw play with them?

Though your larger point is true, that Shaw and Hubbard were comfortable in adventurous settings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think we're getting sidetracked slightly. Wynton told us about his visit to Ornette when he was in his early 20s just to make some music together. I'm not surprised he respects Ornette, I was just surprised he was advocating teaching it alongside the likes of Prez, Bird etc, I was told to come at it later - not least by his older brother!
 

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I thought Circle was Braxton, Corea, Holland, and Altschul. When did Shaw play with them?

Though your larger point is true, that Shaw and Hubbard were comfortable in adventurous settings.
That particular band never recorded but was well documented in interviews with Chick, Woody, Joe Chambers, and others. The band with Woody and Joe was the first edition. That was after "Tones For Joan's Bones".
 

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That particular band never recorded but was well documented in interviews with Chick, Woody, Joe Chambers, and others. The band with Woody and Joe was the first edition. That was after "Tones For Joan's Bones".
OK, thanks. There used to be a video of Braxton discussing Shaw on the Mosaic Records website. He certainly held him in the highest regard.

Count me among those surprised by Wynton's comment about Ornette. But I found this recent quote from Matt Shipp:

Q: Your run-ins with Wynton Marsalis and Stanley Crouch are becoming the stuff of legend, but can you describe your main ideological differences between yourself and those gentlemen?
A: I really have no problem with Wynton He is not making "pronouncements" these days, and I assume he has matured and grown up over the years and most likely has a better perspective of things. ...
He goes on to discuss Crouch in very negative terms but I don't want to be the one starting an argument here so I've omitted that part of the quote.
 

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Crouch knows nothing.

Maybe Wynton has finally outgrown his influence.
 

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"With this power came controversy. The Lincoln Center program has received attacks from all directions. Conservatives decry Marsalis and Crouch as racists for excluding white musicians and composers. "They're talking about race, not aesthetics, and the fact is that this isn't an affirmative-action program," Crouch snaps. With equal fervor, however, progressives accuse the program of pushing a traditionalist agenda that ignores jazz after 1969. "Lincoln Center won't play our music," says Kunle Mwanga, a friend of Crouch's who has managed Ornette Coleman and other avant-garde musicians. "But the most hypocritical thing is that the series is being run by people whose entire reputations rest on avant-garde music." Crouch is reluctant to discuss the much covered controversy, but says that he could easily call his opponents' bluff. "The real problem with the avant-garde is that many of them simply can't play." he explains."

I pulled this from here: http://www.robertboynton.com/articleDisplay.php?article_id=30

This reflects my experience living in New York back in that time with both Wynton and Stanley Crouch. I always found him an interesting writer, but I still find JALC too stuck in the mud for my tastes.
 
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