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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a curious person, so I'd like to know; what was it that caught your ear, what sparked your interest in this art form ?
at what age ?
And now , years later what still makes you interested (one word, or sentence)

for me it was seeing this on television at the age of 12. And requesting the song on the radio so I could tape it , I listened to it untill the tape was totally trashed. ( which made me a total oddball , all my friends were listening to the popular music of the day)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dC3VTBG0tRc
I LOVED the band and Louis Armstrong's playing AND singing.
and the different role and contribution to the music of each instrumentalist.
If i had to chose one word that still attracts me to Jazz it would be Purity.

your answers please ?
 

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My dad was a huge jazz fan, from the original jazz days. He had all these 78 rpm records with Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, Bix Beiderbecke, Bob Crosby, etc. He had also been a semi-pro dancer in his youth. My folks would throw parties and when everybody was drunk enough, my dad would literally roll up the rug and put his jazz 78's on and get everybody dancing. I remember this from a very young age. To me, jazz was always music for dancing and parties. My dad had a great time and so did everybody else. He would whistle along to the solos. He loved Benny Goodman and wanted me to be a Benny Goodman, so when I wanted a sax (about age 8) he insisted I have a clarinet. I never was Benny Goodman. But when I finally got a sax at age 15, I could play it right away and I started playing the music of my youth, which was rock 'n' roll. To this day, I am still playing music for dancing and parties and taking hot solos.
 

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In third-fourth grade watching those videos of Wynton in the early-mid 90's, at the time those were new lol. That wasn't what got me started though, a saxophone and charlie parker did a year later :).
 

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Growing up, every summer my parents would take me to the annual Dixieland jazz festival. I could appreciate it, but always thought it was kinda hokey and predictable. So I didn't really take jazz seriously back then. But my first college dorm room mate had CD's of Chick Corea, Dave Weckl and Miles Davis, and after hearing this contemporary jazz, I was hooked for life. I like big band and traditional jazz, but my favorite jazz by a long shot is the funky fusion from Miles Davis through today's artists such as Joshua Redman. It has everything I could ever want in music: virtuosic, spontaneous, creative solos, a funk beat with a catchy groove, a catchy yet somewhat unpredictable melody, a lot of energy, enough cohesion that it doesn't alienate me and enough variety that I am not bored. Most rock and popular music is boring to me because it is too predictable and repetitive. Hearing a master jazz soloist in action (such as Michael Brecker or Roy Hargrove) to me is awe inspiring, much like watching an Olympic athlete or sports star in action.
 

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hearing Take Five in the Radio at the age of 10. I love the freedom of it.
 

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I heard a small jazz combo w/alto sax playing in the lobby of the local AA. The group was stranded and AA was helping them out, so they "played for their dinner." I learned a lot from that night, besides being mesmerized by the music: An all black group of musicians being helped by an all white club. [This was in NC, in the mid '50s. I was about 12 yo.]
 

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Can't remember that far back but hearing Herbie Mann and Cal Tjader live at the Village Vanguard LP. on radio when 16 put me on the road to ruin! and Roland Kirk sealed my fate.
 

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As a kid, my father had many 78's with all kinds of jazz and I listened as much as a kid could, but it was a radio show out of the Bay area back in the day called the Bob Holmes Vintage Music Machine" where I first heard Charlie Ventura's "Dark Eyes". That is when I was really hooked . After that, I started really listening to my father's wax 78's and his music filled my ears and penetrated my dreams. I was lucky to grow up listening to Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington. While I loved the Glen Miller stuff he had, it was the recording of Benny Goodman's Carnegie hall show in 37, that really sparked me once I was starting to understand what I was hearing. So initially Ventura and then Goodman. After that, I investigated and listened to any jazz I could get my hands on. I would like to give a Thank you for Bob Holmes. Yes, those of us in Northern California owe you a debt of graditude and respect.
 

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My parents were from the big band swing era so I grew up listening to the Dorseys and Benny Goodman. Once I heard Jimmy Dorseys' into on "So Rare," I wanted to play saxophone. I listened to every recording I could find that featured saxophone.

Luckily, by Jr. High I discovered a local library that actually had a jazz collection and I was able to hear a lot more than I would have if I had to buy all those albums. Once I checked out Earl Bostic and I was hooked. Oddly my folks were not happy. Suffice it to say they didn't like that kind of music (they didn't know they didn't like until they saw the album cover). I guess that was the price some of us paid for being raised in poorer, all-white towns.

I was the first in my family to leave home and go to school... Probably the best I could have hoped for. From high school on I collected everything jazz and jazzy. Seeing a young Phil Woods playing for Oliver Nelson and Quincy Jones, and with Monk pretty much was my awakening to a tolerant world. I don't know why my folks never "noticed" Teddy Wilson or Lionel Hampton with Benny, maybe a world of radio instead of TV kept some people unexposed.

Guess that's my two sentences worth.
 

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My Dad had a load of LP's. He listened to Dixieland, Big Band, Traditional Jazz.....

My first recollection was Phil Napolean's Dixieland Band with that fantastic clarinet of Kenny Davern. I pretty much wore that album out. I was about 10 back in the early '60's. Then it was Benny Goodman and Miles Davis Live at the Blackhawk (not together.....). My Dad died young and today that music can evoke such great memories!

Thanks for asking! :)
 

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In '97 I was given Take Five - Dave Brubeck as a Christmas gift.

Haven't stop collecting & listening to Jazz since.

Still trying to learn to play it... :)
 

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My first encounter with jazz had nothing to do with the music - I noticed that the members of the middle school jazz band got a lot more attention than 3rd clarinetists in the concert band. My freshman year in high school I started enjoying Henry Mancini's sound track to Breakfast at Tiffany's (one of my father's favorites, and mostly jazz). That sound track has a piece that features bari sax - I heard that and knew I needed to switch to saxophone. So, in high school I switched to sax and was immediately invited to join the jazz band they were just starting up (since I was now one of only two tenor sax players in the school). Playing in the high school jazz band, listening to what my father listened to, and the all jazz FM station out of NYC (WRVR) exposed me to many forms of jazz. (I got pretty good at finding bargain jazz recordings, too; some of them on 8-track)

In college we had a very active jazz/rock band that was able to arrange a short tour of Europe and even got to attend one week of the Montreux Jazz festival one summer.

Nowadays I continue to enjoy listening to (frequently) and performing jazz (infrequently) for the varieties of styles and forms of expression. (not so easy getting that into one sentence)
 

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In 7th grade, I picked up the saxophone for the first time. Everyone else playing saxophone started in 5th grade, so I got a private teacher so I could catch up to their level quicker. He first taught me the basics of playing, then how to play jazz because I wanted to join the school jazz band. The jazz band got to go to disneyland and my best friend was in it. HA! That's really the only reason why I wanted to. After a few weeks learning jazz, he had me learning out of the Charlie Parker Omnibook. And whenever we started a new song, he had me go buy the recording to listen to. After Charlie Parker, its been a domino effect into Coltrane, Miles, Cannonball, all the way up to present day with Chris Potter, Carl Saunders, etc.
 

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We rarely played records at home, but there were two jazz records around: a 45 of Bird playing I'm In The Mood For Love, Star Eyes (amongst others). And a 33 LP of the Johnny Griffin Sextet (which I still own). Listening to Bird, Johnny, but even more Hank Jones and Kenny Drew did it - I played piano at the time and wanted to play like that so bad! Later the Oscar Peterson TV shows nailed it. I remember watching those shows speechlessly. Only an insane grin would set on my face and not go away.

It's funny - I just don't know why some people get the Jazz virus and most other people don't.
 

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I was listening to big band swing before I could talk, so the Dorseys, Goodman, Ellington etc. were already in the house when I was a tot. And in my early years jazz was just ever present in the society as a whole, so I was always aware of it and liked it.

Probably my first two "epiphany" recordings came the same year, when I was 12: "Bix and Tram", vol 1 (Bix Beiderbeck & Frankie Trumbauer), and "Jazz at Oberlin" (Brubeck Quartet), with particularly Bix on "I'm Coming Virginia" and Desmond on "How High the Moon".


toughtenor - do I get extra credit for the 1956 recording, "The Cool Voice of Rita Reys" with both the Wes Ilcken Combo and The Jazz Messengers? I just about wore the grooves off of it - still have the original LP BTW.
 

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When I was about 12 years old, I heard Maynard Ferguson's band live, at a daytime concert for music students from schools in the area. It was the loudest thing I'd ever heard in my life.

I liked them okay, and since all my friends were buying a Maynard record, it seemed like the cool thing to do -- buying my first record! I went to the only department store in my small central Wisconsin town that carried records, and every other kid at that concert had the same idea -- Maynard's stuff was sold out.

However, in the E-F-G section of the bin, where Maynard's records would have been, I found a 2-LP set by someone named "Stan Getz," and the picture on the cover showed him playing a tenor, the same horn I played.

I brought it home and put it on, and couldn't believe what he sounded like -- I had NO idea the horn I played could sound like that. From that moment on, I was hooked.

(My next record was a Sonny Rollins LP, so my first exposure to recorded tenor gave me yin and yang takes on the kind of sound it could make -- and then I was REALLY hooked!)
 

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I was a small child walking with my parents down a street in New Orleans. My mother pointed to a jazz combo setup on a street corner and asked why can't those folks play in tune?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I was listening to big band swing before I could talk, so the Dorseys, Goodman, Ellington etc. were already in the house when I was a tot. And in my early years jazz was just ever present in the society as a whole, so I was always aware of it and liked it.

Probably my first two "epiphany" recordings came the same year, when I was 12: "Bix and Tram", vol 1 (Bix Beiderbeck & Frankie Trumbauer), and "Jazz at Oberlin" (Brubeck Quartet), with particularly Bix on "I'm Coming Virginia" and Desmond on "How High the Moon".


toughtenor - do I get extra credit for the 1956 recording, "The Cool Voice of Rita Reys" with both the Wes Ilcken Combo and The Jazz Messengers? I just about wore the grooves off of it - still have the original LP BTW.
wow Gary , you have that record ?
That combo was a major landmark in dutch Jazz. There was an annual award named after Wessel Ilcken after his untimely death.
 
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