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Didn't Buescher stop making tru-tones at around 1928-1929, and start making new aristocrat at around 1932? If so, what saxes were they making between then? Or, are my numbers just off?
 

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Your dates for the True Tone are off. The New Aristocrat was the transition model between the True Tone and the Aristocrat. Therefore, there is no model between the True Tone and the New Aristocrat.

One thing to be aware of is New Aristocrat altos started production about a year before New Aristocrat tenors. New Aristocrat altos began in 1932. However, at some point in 1933 Buescher stopped production of True Tone tenors and started New Aristocrats. Thus, one can find both 1933 True Tone and New Aristocrat tenors. My New Aristocrat tenor was made in 1934. Then, the early Aristocrats started production in 1935.

New Aristocrats can be fantastic horns. Of course, it sometimes comes down to finding a particular horn that really does it for you. When I found my '34 New Aristocrat I knew that I was set for life. No other Buescher (or any other brand) does it for me like this horn.

Roger
 

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Roger is right...the sequence was Trutone-New Aristocrat-Aristocrat.

The other thing to consider though is that while the bell engravings seemed to denote the "new model," all these horns were changing while their name stayed the same. The late Trutones are very similar to the early New Aristocrats. The naming of a model had a lot to do with selling more horns and some to do with producing a "new horn." The neck changed several times on the NA and the key work on the late Trutones is very similar to the NAs. Serial numbers matter so much with Bueschers because they changed so much on these horns from the late 20s to the early 40s even though, technically, there were only three different models.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, I knew the New Aristos were the transtitional models betwenn the tru-tones and aristos, I guess my dates for the tru-tones were off. Thanks.
 

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Vivance1's point about serial numbers is an important one. It can also extend deeper to individual horns within a serial number range. I've heard stories about Buescher workers assembling horns from whatever parts were around at the time. If one looks at a large selection of vintage Bueschers you'll probably come across some really interesting horns.

The thing that I find especially intriguing about the New Aristocrat is its sound. From my limited experience with New Aristocrats I've found their sound to have some different tonal qualities from either the True Tone or the Aristocrat. I'd say it's closer to a late model True Tone. But, it's bigger...not quite as focused and "woody". In addition, the New Aristocrat has what I describe as a "ringing" sound. Man, it is so beautiful! I haven't heard this quality in any True Tone I've played....nor in any Aristocrat. One of my local music buddies has a 1935 Aristocrat tenor. From its serial number, it would have been one of the early Aristocrats. I've tried it and it doesn't have the ring that my '34 New Aristocrat has. In this respect there is something mysterious about the New Aristocrat. It's too bad that it is often overlooked in favor of late 30's Aristocrats or late 40's/early 50's Top Hat & Canes. But, that makes it better for those of us who have discovered the special qualities of the New Aristocrat!

Roger
 

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My '36 Crat tenor has the "ring" that you speak of. Maybe your friend's just doesn't for some reason. This horn really does it for me, too. I like how it's got a small amount of resistance so you can hold back when you want to, but can really let it rip when you want, too.
 

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Exactly! Regardless of what model we have, when one finds that special Buescher that really does it for us it is a treasure.
 

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Roger, you've got me thinking that I need to put down my NA alto for a while and revisit the gorgeous NA tenor that I got from Chu-jerry.:D

Do you know anyone here that has an NA tenor other than you and me?
 

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Yes, there are a few others....not many. If I remember correctly I think PaulWL has one. Of course, Paul has just about EVERYTHING! ha ha ha
 

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I play an NA stencil as my main horn. It's killer. Especially since I just picked up a selmer soloist. My horn has the ring you're referring to that can't be found anywhere else.
 

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Roger Aldridge said:
Regardless of what model we have, when one finds that special Buescher that really does it for us it is a treasure.
This is so true. I think there are some variations from one horn to the next even among the same Buescher models (this is certainly true of other fine horns, like the MKVI, for example). My silver-plated 156 tenor definitely has something very special about it that I noticed the instant I first played it and it has grown on me over time. I know exactly what you guys mean about a "ring" to the tone. I don't hear that in my MKVI, as much as I like that horn, but both my Buescher Aristocrat tenors (156 and "art deco" series one) have it. The 156 has it in "spades."
 
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