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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Arthur_Rollini_Sidney_Stoneburn.jpg

Art Rollini played tenor in umpty-ump Big Bands in the 30's through the 60's, including Benny Goodman at the famous Carnegie Hall concert. I don't know the date on that photo, it's from Wikipedia. The neck could be a Conn or a Buescher. The marching lyre holder is on the left side of the horn, from the players view, and I think that Bueschers had it on the other side, but I'm no expert.

Anybody know?
 

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Never mind the horn, how'd he get his hair to do that?!
 

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It looks like a Conn since the neck seems to have the support bar underneath. Possibly a 10m or New Wonder II.
I'd also guess Conn from the neck brace. It doesn't look like it has split bell keys so I'd say 10M, but it's hard to tell without better pictures.
 

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The photo is by Wm. P. Gottlieb (1917-2006), who is rightly renowned for his photographic portraits of jazz musicians. Others in the photo are Sidney Stoneburn and Vernon Brown. It was taken in the ABC Studio, New York, May 1947.

Rollini's instrument is a Conn tenor, no doubt, but it is not a New Wonder Series I, judging by the configuration of the palm keys — they're too modern. It's probably not a Series II either, for similar reasons, although the NWII-10M Transitionals had the new palm keys. The design of the octave key rules out a 30M.

Given the date of the photograph, Rollini's instrument could well be a Conn 10M.

On the other hand: the horn looks quite dull — there's not much shine off it, and if you look closely at the left side of the bell, there is what looks to me like a worn patch in the lacquer, worn from rubbing against Rollini's trouser leg.

In a 1935 portrait photo, Rollini is holding a shiny, good-as-new Conn tenor, which has split bell keys and is very likely a late model Tranny. Could this be the same horn as he was using 12 years later ?

Arthur Rollini 1935.jpg
 

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The photo is by Wm. P. Gottlieb (1917-2006), who is rightly renowned for his photographic portraits of jazz musicians. Others in the photo are Sidney Stoneburn and Vernon Brown. It was taken in the ABC Studio, New York, May 1947.

Rollini's instrument is a Conn tenor, no doubt, but it is not a New Wonder Series I, judging by the configuration of the palm keys — they're too modern. It's probably not a Series II either, for similar reasons, although the NWII-10M Transitionals had the new palm keys. The design of the octave key rules out a 30M.

Given the date of the photograph, Rollini's instrument could well be a Conn 10M.

On the other hand: the horn looks quite dull — there's not much shine off it, and if you look closely at the left side of the bell, there is what looks to me like a worn patch in the lacquer, worn from rubbing against Rollini's trouser leg.

In a 1935 portrait photo, Rollini is holding a shiny, good-as-new Conn tenor, which has split bell keys and is very likely a late model Tranny. Could this be the same horn as he was using 12 years later ?

View attachment 213784
He looks plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My dad had a moustache like that in photos of him in the early to mid 1940's. I think he sported it until shortly before he met my mother in 1955. Art. Rollini wrote a book of reminiscences called "Thirty years in the Big Bands", which I'm interested enough in that I might purchase. My "to-read" stack of books is out of control so I might hold off.

Art was voted one of the top ten Tenor players by Metronome magazine in 1939. In his book he says He had no idea why.

I'm on a small mission to find guys who played Bueschers during this era...pre-WWII and wasn't sure bout Art. if I'd see the 1935 photo, I'd have not chased down more info, which in fact would have been a loss. Art Rollini died in 1993.
 

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My dad had a moustache like that in photos of him in the early to mid 1940's. I think he sported it until shortly before he met my mother in 1955. Art. Rollini wrote a book of reminiscences called "Thirty years in the Big Bands", which I'm interested enough in that I might purchase. My "to-read" stack of books is out of control so I might hold off.

Art was voted one of the top ten Tenor players by Metronome magazine in 1939. In his book he says He had no idea why.

I'm on a small mission to find guys who played Bueschers during this era...pre-WWII and wasn't sure bout Art. if I'd see the 1935 photo, I'd have not chased down more info, which in fact would have been a loss. Art Rollini died in 1993.
Alan, thanks for the heads-up about the book. I just ordered it! Yeah, my "to read" pile is also out of control, but what's one more? ;-)

John
 

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Alan, thanks for the heads-up about the book. I just ordered it! Yeah, my "to read" pile is also out of control, but what's one more? ;-)
You can't have too many books! Assuming you do read them, of course. Sounds like an interesting book; I have to check it out.
 
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