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Discussion Starter #1
What size Meyer alto sax mouthpiece should I use for my Selmer Series II?
 

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If you are moving from a Selmer stock C*, a 5M would be a tad more open and a 6M would be like a Selmer D tip. I like the 6M best.
 

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I agree Bruce, if it isnt a stretch 6 is a really nice tip for a Meyer. It seems like they really sing and have a great presence at that size. As they get larger they loose some of the pop and become more about the core. That isnt a bad thing...just different.
 

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My standard what-mouthpiece comment - everyone is different. I have a 6M-Medium Chamber (only because that's what's stamped on it - I have no idea if the chamber is medium) and for me it doesn't come close to a 6S-Medium Chamber I played for years. I also have a 7M-Small Chamber (the stamping, the stamping!!!) and it for me is better than the 6M-M, but not as easy-playing as the 6S-M. All of the chambers look similar, FWIW. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I play on a Vandoren AL3, but I need a Meyer for jazz, if that helps suggestions
 

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Why do you need a Meyer for jazz? Does your Vandoren sound good and have sufficient volume and intonation control? You are free to move about the cabin - and play jazz on what you play now. DAVE
 

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Why do you need a Meyer for jazz? Does your Vandoren sound good and have sufficient volume and intonation control? You are free to move about the cabin - and play jazz on what you play now. DAVE
Normally, I'd say do that first, but the AL3 has such a small tip and is so specialized for classical playing, that it's VERY HARD to get a sound with projection. Try a Meyer 5M, you'll have less trouble adjusting to that tip size than a bigger one.
 

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I used to play a 5M but switched to a 6M because I found the 5M to be too close to a classical tone. If you want the Meyer as your dedicated jazz mouthpiece, I'd say go for the 6M. I find that with the 6M I can get all kinds of amazing, edgy, smoking hot jazz and funky fusion tones out of it, but with a little extra lip pressure and less air speed a sweet, very refined sound as well. The 6M's tip opening shouldn't be that hard to adjust to, just use a somewhat less stiff reed than you use for the AL3. I like Vandoren Java 3's, V 16 3's, Rico Jazz Select Mediums, and for those gigs requiring lots of buzzy edge, the ZZ never ceases to amaze me. For that matter, I don't think I've ever tried a reed that didn't sound good on the Meyer 6M, as long as it was the right strength. But jazz reeds (like the ZZ and Java) run about a half strength less stiff than traditional reeds, so if you insist on using, say, a regular Vandoren (blue box), I'd use a 2 1/2.
 

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Archsax: That may be YOUR reaction to an AL3, but others may not have the same results. From all the good classical players I've heard, I'd die for a sound like that - in jazz. Good tone is good tone regardless of what kind of music is being played, and the classical recordings I've heard had players with wonderful tone.

As far as I'm concerned, once good tone is achieved, then it is up to the player to execute classical notes from a chart or jazz notes from the head. I just do not believe this claim that one type of music requires certain equipment while another type of music requires different equipment.

I used to play a Meyer 6S-Medium Chamber on alto. It was far superior to the 6M (which I also had - still do) for me. But I changed to different mouthpieces over the years and have recently been playing a Selmer S-80 C* - IN JAZZ! Oh NO! A so-called "classical" piece for jazz? Will wonders never cease . . . DAVE
 

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Archsax: That may be YOUR reaction to an AL3, but others may not have the same results. From all the good classical players I've heard, I'd die for a sound like that - in jazz. Good tone is good tone regardless of what kind of music is being played, and the classical recordings I've heard had players with wonderful tone.

As far as I'm concerned, once good tone is achieved, then it is up to the player to execute classical notes from a chart or jazz notes from the head. I just do not believe this claim that one type of music requires certain equipment while another type of music requires different equipment.

I used to play a Meyer 6S-Medium Chamber on alto. It was far superior to the 6M (which I also had - still do) for me. But I changed to different mouthpieces over the years and have recently been playing a Selmer S-80 C* - IN JAZZ! Oh NO! A so-called "classical" piece for jazz? Will wonders never cease . . . DAVE
Woah, I use to play an AL3 for classical, friend! They're fantastic mouthpieces, but I could never imagine getting a jazz sound out of it. My AL4 which I use now, yeah, it can work for that, I use it for pit orchestras alot, but the AL3 is VERY closed. It's not about being classical, so much as it as having one of the smallest tips I've ever seen in sax mouthpieces.
 

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So you are telling us that because the AL3 has a small tip-opening that it won't work for jazz? I think you missed my point. DAVE
 

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@Dave: sure, you can play jazz on a mouthpiece with a small tip opening (like the Selmer C*) and a traditional reed cut, but you'll never get the bright, loud, edgy tone professional and even most experienced amateur jazz sax players go for. An inexperienced player who doesn't use enough breath support in the first place won't even hear a big difference in tone regardless of what mouthpiece is used. But a player using enough breath support and a well formed embouchure will hear a huge difference. Saying that you're content playing jazz on a Selmer C* is like saying you're content playing heavy metal or even hard or classic rock on an acoustic guitar. Sure, you can do it, but you'll never get the same results that you would out of, say, a Fender Stratocaster through a Marshall stack. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with playing jazz on a Selmer C*. In fact, that's a good choice of a mouthpiece if you're playing, say, in a big band setting and you don't want your tone to stand out from the group. But mouthpieces with a small tip opening were designed to produce a softer, darker tone without the edge that many jazz players love. Like my Selmer C*, I love my acoustic guitar, and play it in many settings. But there are other occasions when there is just no substitute for the Stratocaster with a cranked up tube amp (translated into mouthpiece terms, the Meyer 6M).
 

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I've been playing for more than 50 years. I play acoustic; I never blow into microphones unless in a recording situation where it is required for future mixing. I'll put my set-up against most others and hold my own for volume and tone. I have three Meyers, Bilger-Morgan, Beechler Diamond Inlays, Runyon Jaguar - among the loudest alto mouthpieces available, yet my C* with the Fibracell reed is smoother, fuller, louder (if pushed) and better tone-wise than any of them - for me. Maybe not for you.

Never say never . . . these issues depend on the individual player. I usually need to back-off a bit to avoid overblowing the brass.

My point is that whoever claims that because HE gets good results from some mouthpiece, be it an AL3 or a Meyer 6M or whatever, that everyone will get the same results. It just isn't true. I've had countless experiences with this. To put down someone for their mouthpiece choice, based on your experience, is short-sighted. DAVE
 

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Sorry Dave, I didn't intend to put you down. I'm just saying there's a reason people pay huge sums of money for mouthpieces with a large facing. In my experience, I've had countless gigs where even my beloved Meyer wasn't loud enough, I couldn't even hear myself, so people in the audience hearing me was out of the question. So I put on the Beechler and, well, problem solved. Anyway, no hard feelings intended. I was just offering another perspective.
 
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