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Morning guys, I am a beginner in playing saxo. One thing that I always want to know since the first time I learned is how to produce a bright but also have a warmness on it. I just bought Dukoff Alto mpc which I think it has a bright and edgy sound that I really love but honestly the mpc is still on its way from the seller. What do you guys suggest to help me producing a bright, edgy, but also have a warmness on it? Is it the reed or the ligature should I adjust or anything? Thanks
 

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try the theo wanne durga, i was searchiing that sam sound that you, bright but warm. After many mouthpieces that i have tryed, i will stay with the durga for a longer time
 

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I find it difficult to describe a tone in words.
But to me, bright and warm seem 2 contradictory aspects (a bit like warm and cold at the same time).
The sound that I aim for would be a warm, full tone; lots of low harmonics, a mellow tone. A bright tone is something I associate with a shrill, sharp sound, more high harmonics .....
 

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Since you are speaking about an alto, I don't think you have to worry about it being bright enough. I'd look for a mpc that will allow you to play with some warmth. So best to avoid a really high baffle mpc on alto.
 

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Morning guys, I am a beginner in playing saxo. One thing that I always want to know since the first time I learned is how to produce a bright but also have a warmness on it. I just bought Dukoff Alto mpc which I think it has a bright and edgy sound that I really love but honestly the mpc is still on its way from the seller. What do you guys suggest to help me producing a bright, edgy, but also have a warmness on it? Is it the reed or the ligature should I adjust or anything? Thanks
I wouldn't recommend a Dukoff as a starter mouthpiece, but since you have it coming ...
It's going to be bright, so the best way to warm it up is to use a reed with a cut that will produce a darker tone, such as the Vandoren Traditional or V21, or a Rico Reserve or Grand Concert Select. Also a Rovner Dark or BG Flex ligature might make a difference.

But the core component to your sound is going to be your embouchure and air control. With time and practice you will be able to get just about any tone you want out of just about any combination of mouthpiece/ligature and reed.
 

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Morning guys, I am a beginner in playing saxo. One thing that I always want to know since the first time I learned is how to produce a bright but also have a warmness on it. I just bought Dukoff Alto mpc which I think it has a bright and edgy sound that I really love but honestly the mpc is still on its way from the seller. What do you guys suggest to help me producing a bright, edgy, but also have a warmness on it? Is it the reed or the ligature should I adjust or anything? Thanks
I think you should list some players and/or recordings that have the kind of sound you would like to make. (Not heavily over-processed "smooth jazz" cuts where you're hearing more sound engineer and mixing board effects, but recordings that were made relatively straight and flat.)

Taking some prominent alto players, there are big differences in tonal concept among Johnny Hodges, Charlie Parker, Sonny Criss, Phil Woods, and Cannonball Adderley. Which of these appeals to you?
 

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spend alot of time on overtone work and overtone matching. You can find all that stuff on You Tube. The Dukoff will be bright. Ive found plain Rico reeds will take some edge off a a bright piece. So rather than a Vandoran Java 2.5 a plain Rico 3 is much darker. for me. But what you want is what you can do with your throat/oral cavity. Get a teacher for at least a month to help. Good luck K
 

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As a beginner, buy a Yamaha 4C and get on with practicing. There's really no need to start looking at mouthpieces until you have a good fundamental foundation on technique.
 

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I've always used a Beechler Hard Rubber number 5 on alto with a Vandoren Traditional number 3 and it has given me the perfect balance of brightness and warmth. Best of luck on finding what works for you! I've been playing for 22 years and I'm always trying new things to see if something may work better for me. It's a never ending thing with us sax guys!
 

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+1 on the Yamaha 4c. Put the Dukoff away for a few years.

Other mouthpieces you should consider *_as a beginner_* are the Fobes Debut and the Bari Esprit. Either of these (or the Yamaha) will produce a good, clear tone. Brightness and warmth (which might be contradictory) will come with practice.
 
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