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What, if any, is the difference between a copy and a stencil?

The first question may answer this, but is a stencil and exact clone of all the parts?

Thanks.
 

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A stencil is an instrument made by one company (eg. Yamaha or Yanagisawa) but with another company's name 'stencilled' onto it (eg. Vito or Martin).

But a copy is just that - an existing instrument (eg. a Selmer SA80II) is copied by another company in the Far East, but won't (or SHOULDN'T) bear the same name as the original, and usually retails at a fraction of the cost as the original. This has been going on in the guitar market for years - Strat, Telecaster and Les Paul copies have been made to fill the gap in the market, both by the actual companies that make the originals, or with other names on the head.

Look at a lot of Chinese instruments to see where they coied their designs from - Lark copied Moennig flutes, oboes and bassoons, and Selmer clarinets and saxes. Now look under flutes on eBay - there's a loads of Yamaha 211S copies listed there.
 

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A copy is not a stencil. A stencil is made by the same company as the horn it is stenciled from (the term stencil refers to a horn being completely made by one company but unengraved, then bought by a second company who just used a stencil to engrave their name on the horn).
Stencil is often a tricky term, as there tend to be two types of stencils (not referring to copies): exact stencils (such as with many european manufacturers, such as Dolnet and Buffet, as well as the aforementioned Japanese examples) where the stencil is the exact same horn as the model it is stenciled after, and "watered-down" stencils, such as Conn Pan Am's, which tend to be similar horns to the equivalent top of the line Conn instruments minus the RTH and often with keywork or body tubes a generation older.
 

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I rather think there is more to it than that. Both made by Yamaha in USA? Or both made by Yamaha in Japan? OR one in Japan and one in USA, but subtly different?

The YAS23 saxes that I see, sourced DIRECT from Japan, are not identical to any Vito model I have seen. Perhaps I have just never seen a 7131R.

Likewise, all the student Yamaha clarinets I have seen have screwed-in posts, but not the Vitos I have seen.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
I rather think there is more to it than that. Both made by Yamaha in USA? Or both made by Yamaha in Japan? OR one in Japan and one in USA, but subtly different?

The YAS23 saxes that I see, sourced DIRECT from Japan, are not identical to any Vito model I have seen. Perhaps I have just never seen a 7131R.
Yamaha just this month closed their Grand Rapids, Michigan facility. Up until now, Yamaha made all the parts abroad, and sent their YAS23 student saxophones in parts/peices for assembly to GR, and the 7131Rs were sent to and assembled in Elkhorn, Wisc, at the Leblanc plant. I believe that the Vito saxophones you are seeing are 7133 models, which are made for Leblanc by Jupiter. Best way to determine this, is by looking at the " i " in "Vito". If it is an upside triangle, it's a 7131R, it it's a "*", it's a 7133.

However being the Yamaha GR plant is now closed, all the student models are being assembled abroad and imported to the USA as complete units.
 

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Yes. I see mainly 7133.
Thanks for the clarification.
 

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I cannot remember. I don't think so, because I tend to remember remarkable things, and I have always expected a Vito to be made in USA (or France - LeBlanc connection).

Actually I did not see many Vito saxes, and not any in the last 3 years. Vito clarinets have been more common.
 
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