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What Pads/Resonators would you choose to repad a 1936 Selmer BA s/n 21*** Tenor & why? This horn will be overhauled starting in 6 weeks time. Pads/Resonators will be ordered once the research is done. Really hope some Techs chime in on this one, thank you.
 

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Not a tech but you would approach this in two ways; one, replace with original type if so-equipped: two, replace with MK VI-type as far as tone-boosters are concerned. Its usually very important to use the original pad thickness to maintain the original geometry/function of the horn. Hopefully the keys have never been bent to accommodate thicker or thinner pads but if they have, you might be stuck with it.
The most important question is whether you intend to maintain/restore it to original mechanical condition or modify it to take advantage of modern pads/boosters, etc.
 

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Not a tech but you would approach this in two ways; one, replace with original type if so-equipped: two, replace with MK VI-type as far as tone-boosters are concerned. Its usually very important to use the original pad thickness to maintain the original geometry/function of the horn. Hopefully the keys have never been bent to accommodate thicker or thinner pads but if they have, you might be stuck with it.
The most important question is whether you intend to maintain/restore it to original mechanical condition or modify it to take advantage of modern pads/boosters, etc.
A third possiblility which you kind of implied:

If what's on there now isn't what was originally, but you like it, just do that again.

A fourth possiblity:

Pick something that is commonly available all over, so if you need a pad replaced chop chop you can have it done anywhere.
 

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if one was interested to put back things as they were when the saxophone was made then one would have to source pads that are no longer there.

The possible sonic argument would imply that said saxophone could only be played with a mouthpiece made for it and at the very least contemporary to the saxophone, which is rather nonsensical.

So ANY pad which suits the construction of the sax wold be suitable.

Lately I am seeing many people using musiccenter black pads and I have recently seen them with amazing domed brass resonators looking stunning on a Conn Chu Berry Soprano Artist in mat silver and gold plate accents and keys. Very dapper.
 

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if one was interested to put back things as they were when the saxophone was made then one would have to source pads that are no longer there.

The possible sonic argument would imply that said saxophone could only be played with a mouthpiece made for it and at the very least contemporary to the saxophone, which is rather nonsensical.

So ANY pad which suits the construction of the sax wold be suitable.

Lately I am seeing many people using musiccenter black pads and I have recently seen them with amazing domed brass resonators looking stunning on a Conn Chu Berry Soprano Artist in mat silver and gold plate accents and keys. Very dapper.
Well, of course, you can't EXACTLY duplicate the original pads and boosters, but you can certainly choose from among what's available today a choice that is very close to what they used then, or you can choose something that's quite a bit different. I assumed that was what the OP was asking, not which platform to use to board the faster than the speed of light shuttle.

I mean, if you buy a Model A with no engine, no one suggests that you have to scour the earth to find the exact engine block that it was originally shipped with, but you DO have the choice to put another model A engine from the same or close model year, or to drop in a 429 cubic inch Cobra engine. One of them approximates the original experience; the other one doesn't.
 

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I like the idea of the 429 Cobra. But then you get into upgrading suspension, transmission, brakes, etc. etc. etc.
 

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if one was interested to put back things as they were when the saxophone was made then one would have to source pads that are no longer there.

The possible sonic argument would imply that said saxophone could only be played with a mouthpiece made for it and at the very least contemporary to the saxophone, which is rather nonsensical.

So ANY pad which suits the construction of the sax wold be suitable.

Lately I am seeing many people using musiccenter black pads and I have recently seen them with amazing domed brass resonators looking stunning on a Conn Chu Berry Soprano Artist in mat silver and gold plate accents and keys. Very dapper.
That is truly nonsensical. I made no such implication - you're trying to read something between the lines that isn't there. The point is, its the owner's decision whether or not to put it back to original or not. Any special pad needed can easily be worked up out of readily available pads/parts.
 

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In my opinion the best approach would be to ask the tech who will be repadding the sax what brand of pads he/she recommends and likes to install. Once you have that information you can choose the "cosmetics" such as whether you prefer plastic or metal resonators. Which ones you choose will make no difference in the sound so long as they are the same size.
 

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That is truly nonsensical. I made no such implication - you're trying to read something between the lines that isn't there. .
I wasn’t addressing you commenting on what you wrote or I would have quoted you as I am doing now. I was simply speaking my mind as I suppose you are doing with yours. We are here to debate . I am not arguing, I am debating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
In my opinion the best approach would be to ask the tech who will be repadding the sax what brand of pads he/she recommends and likes to install. Once you have that information you can choose the "cosmetics" such as whether you prefer plastic or metal resonators. Which ones you choose will make no difference in the sound so long as they are the same size.
Thank you, that is the Mr Stohrer take on it also, that is what will be done.
 

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Same as for any other sax:

Traditional pads from a long-standing, reputable manufacturer, with some waterproofing to the surface that does not have stickiness issues.
IMO plastic resonators are best for various reasons eg lightest, non-corroding, cheapest. I see no reason for anything else, unless you have a cosmetic preference that overrides)

Firmness of felt: Medium. Squishy has a bad feel. Hard is a lot more demanding of high-precision alignment and precision adjustment of the entire mechanism.
Colour: irrelevant.
Animal for the leather: Traditional, standard. Pig skin is tough but somewhat irregular. Kangaroo skin is tougher but is likely to be porous (hence leaks air and absorbs moisture which makes pads age fast. Quality pads do not normally fail from not being tough enough. They fail when they net too hard, or when cut by a sharp tone hole edge.

If you have a reputable tech, take their advice. A technician will do the best, most reliable job, using pads they have used many times before.
This is not a good place to decide which pads to use.
 

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FWIW...I own a 1941 BA Tenor Sax.

When I bought it in 1980 it had been recently repadded with typical Selmer pads with brown nylon resonators. I liked the sound and stayed with those pads until last year (2018). I never had the Sax overhauled up to 2018...just had pads replaced as needed.

In 2018 I finally had a complete overhaul done and agonized over pad choice.

In the end I selected black kangaroo pads with slightly domed metal resonators though I was never 'unhappy' with the Selmer pads and brown nylon resonators.

My decision was influenced by a Sax player that I know who had his Mark VI overhauled by the same repair person (near Syracuse,NY) and who had used the kangaroo pads.

My horn plays great...probably more to do with the quality of the overhaul than the pads. I'll post back on this thread in about 20 years and let you know how they held up !

Good luck with your decision.
 

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Same as for any other sax:

Traditional pads from a long-standing, reputable manufacturer, with some waterproofing to the surface that does not have stickiness issues.
IMO plastic resonators are best for various reasons eg lightest, non-corroding, cheapest. I see no reason for anything else, unless you have a cosmetic preference that overrides)

Firmness of felt: Medium. Squishy has a bad feel. Hard is a lot more demanding of high-precision alignment and precision adjustment of the entire mechanism.
Colour: irrelevant.
Animal for the leather: Traditional, standard. Pig skin is tough but somewhat irregular. Kangaroo skin is tougher but is likely to be porous (hence leaks air and absorbs moisture which makes pads age fast. Quality pads do not normally fail from not being tough enough. They fail when they net too hard, or when cut by a sharp tone hole edge.

If you have a reputable tech, take their advice. A technician will do the best, most reliable job, using pads they have used many times before.
This is not a good place to decide which pads to use.
I agree with all the above, but would also add "replacement pads readily available and/or typically kept in stock at shops in your area". While I agree that the difference between pads and boosters in performance is trivial, yet my remaining shred of OCD still prefers for them all to match on a horn, even though I know it probably doesn't matter a bit. My guess is that if you have an expert working on the horn, the stuff he uses the most and prefers, will probably also be readily available even if the next time you have to replace a pad you have to go to a different person.

Another thing might be "When you get the horn back, get 2 or 3 replacement pads for each of the palm key pads." These are the ones that go bad first and they're pretty easy for the owner to replace, since they don't have stack interactions.
 

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... My horn plays great...probably more to do with the quality of the overhaul than the pads....
Indeed!

I'll post back on this thread in about 20 years and let you know how they held up !
Haha. This forum won't exist. :( The price of rapid technological change.
 

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... Another thing might be "When you get the horn back, get 2 or 3 replacement pads for each of the palm key pads." These are the ones that go bad first and they're pretty easy for the owner to replace, since they don't have stack interactions.
If you do that, then get one for the Eb key too.
 
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