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Hi,
I love this song, and I often play it during gigs with my quartet.
The question is : what does this title mean?
During gigs I never know what to say about this one... Is it a reference to something? In what sense must "spirit" be taken? English is not my mother tongue, I surely miss something about this title...

https://youtu.be/0dFtZbha29M

Many thanks in advance
 

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I guess that it is a made up expression comprising “ Talk the talk & Walk the walk” ( to act in accordance to what one says) and the religious term "Walk in the spirit “( to show obedience to G-d’s will).

So, I guess, one is obedient to and enlightened by the Spirit (and here one may speculate any intended or not double entendre, I know this is not French but a French sounding English term....) but should also speak (play?) in the Spirit’s spirit.
 

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Another guess: I think it means something like "Walk and talk with spirit," which could mean acting with enthusiasm and inspiration, but also acting with what people sometimes call "mindfulness." But that's just a guess!
 

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Be spiritual with thought, action and ... even on a walk :)
After all, the melody is light and walking-rhythmic, at least for me ...
 

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Another guess: I think it means something like "Walk and talk with spirit," which could mean acting with enthusiasm and inspiration, but also acting with what people sometimes call "mindfulness." But that's just a guess!
This is what I'd hope it would mean, rather than some new age mumbo jumbo. It's also possible they just made it up on the spot and thought it sounded kind of cool or deep.
 

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This is what I'd hope it would mean, rather than some new age mumbo jumbo. It's also possible they just made it up on the spot and thought it sounded kind of cool or deep.
Well, McCoy Tyner wrote the song . The man definitely IS deep .
 

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Well, McCoy Tyner wrote the song . The man definitely IS deep .
+1. McCoy Tyner is one of my all time favorite piano players. I saw him play on a couple of occasions at Keystone Korner back in the 70s. He'd sound great on any tune, no matter what it was called. And yeah, that's a fantastic tune, regardless of its title!

I heard or read an interview with Charlie Parker where the interviewer asked him where he got the titles for his tunes or what the titles meant. His response, paraphrased, but pretty close to an exact quote: "I have no idea, they'd name them after I left the studio."
 

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I heard or read an interview with Charlie Parker where the interviewer asked him where he got the titles for his tunes or what the titles meant. His response, paraphrased, but pretty close to an exact quote: "I have no idea, they'd name them after I left the studio."
I remember that as well. If forced to bet, I would guess "Jazz Masters of the Forties" as the source, but I am on my third copy lent out and not returned. Kinda like "Goedel, Escher, Bach" so I could not check.

What is more, I recall the same content attributed to other musicians. That is, they were not interested in words, labels, or descriptions. They just laid down the music. The company, tired of asking, plumps down a title. Heck with it.

This is supposedly one of the reasons why Calvert Cleandome's version of "Honeysuckel Rose" ends up being entitled "F Major Romp" [besides attempts to evade royalties, perhaps].
 
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