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Discussion Starter #1
Not saying that they aren't worth that much but I'm just wondering why when there are now quite a few really good modern custom mouthpieces out there for 250.00 dollars or less. I mean I sold a handmade Guardala Crescent for about 800.00 a few years ago on e-bay. It was a bid up that high. I hated the thing myself although I played it at one time. The person that bought it was happy as a clam and thought they got a great deal. I wasn't about to argue with them. I have never tried a vintage Florida link or whatever. For those that have delved into that world are they really that good? Just wondering. Maybe this is an old discussion.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
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It's how the market works. If many people desires items that hasn't been in production for quite some time, even if they were common, cheap or "run of the mill" back then, it increases the value by means of supply and demand.
 

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People who are willing to give up $$$ without taking the time to really look for other options, because they do exist.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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First of all this is not a diss.....But this topic has been beat to death. The simple answer is "Nothing, makes any mouthpiece worth that much other than what a person is willing to spend for it." I would never pay that kind of money for a mouthpiece...I only paid 1500 for my horn. But there are people who have to have that Meyer Cannonball vintage 5m and will pay better than 2k to have it. I say more power to them. Someone referred to this as chops in a box. I would never pay that much, but I have sold pieces for over 1k in the past, because someone had to have it. Anyway I wouldn't worry about it personally.....if you play well, then that's all you can ask for. The same thing goes for horns. People pay 20k for a SBA tenor, when the really good guys can play circles around them with a Series II. That's my 2 cents.
 

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To quote Alan Greenspan, “…irrational exuberance...”

full quote:
“But how do we know when irrational exuberance has unduly escalated asset values, which then become subject to unexpected and prolonged contractions as they have in Japan over the past decade?”

[EDIT] – Okay. Maybe bragging rights could also be cited.
 

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Also mostly sound I guess.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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People pay too much for a vintage mouthpiece because they believe the hype and/or can't be bothered to find a modern onejust as good or better for less money.

Or, people pay too much for a modern mouthpiece because they believe the hype and/or can't be bothered to find a vintage one just as good or better for less money.

Or, people pay too much for a modern mouthpiece because they believe the hype and/or can't be bothered to another modern one one just as good or better for less money.
 

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All good answers. Also, there's the "Greater Fool" theory -- I may be paying too much, but it's desirable, and in a year or so someone will give me twice as much for it.

I guess that's the same as irrational exuberance, but I like greater fool.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Ok so this topic has been beat but I still see people coming on here and other places selling vintage mouthpieces for a bunch of money which I am not complaining about because they have a right to do that and probably paid a bunch of money themselves. Of course you mouthpiece maker guys are going to say that the vintage thing pricing is wacked because your stuff is probably just as good or better but you don't want to or can't sell it for those vintage prices. It's just kind of a mystery to me still because there are some really good players out there that do try a bunch of stuff and end up with some vintage Link that they paid some serious cash for. I have a copy of one which works well for me and can't understand it but maybe some people just have to have the authentic thing. Anyway sorry to beat a dead horse.
 

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For some players, those vintage pieces are simply better. Some players think that the price is worth it. Also, many pieces today are made to play a little louder and brighter than their vintage counterparts. It is really hard to compare new pieces with old. I find most of the magic that comes out of the vintage mouthpieces is a result of having to put more air into them to compete with the louder playing situations. I think its that overblowing sensation that brings the best out of a mouthpiece. I think its kind of like comparing a guitar player who plays a small amp turned way up versus one who plays a loud amp at mid volume. The small amp turned up has a more interesting sound.
 

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I've had some of the classics of the past; a vintage Meyer alto and a tenor Florida Link (both of which were included with horns that were given to me). In both cases I can say that they were incredibly decent mouthpieces and I can understand why folks seek them out. However, in my case... I just like something more open tipped than the standard mouthpieces of the past. So, rather than alter one of the classics, I was able to find modern alternatives that more than sufficed.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2008
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I mean I sold a handmade Guardala Crescent for about 800.00 a few years ago on e-bay. It was a bid up that high. I hated the thing myself although I played it at one time. The person that bought it was happy as a clam and thought they got a great deal.
And I think he got it right, it was a great deal as, if sold today, would bring at least 1200$, bringing a 50% return on investment in few years (you did not specify how many a few are, so I am figuring 2-3 years) which is hard to make.
Here it is the foremost reason why vintage gear can fetch those prices.
If all you have to do is playing, the best bet is probably a refaced affordable blank, such as today's Otto Links. No need for further discussion on this ...
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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For some players, those vintage pieces are simply better.
I agree that in some cases, some of the old pieces are better than most of what you can get today. I used a Slant sig bari for years, all the time trying to find modern pieces a s good or better. Then I found out it was possible top make an exact copy of it that plays exactly the same, so there is no need to buy vintage pieces, except for the nostalgia/collectors value. One day I will bring out a production model of that copy, but I 'm sure many people will think it's somehow different to the original from which it is cast.
 

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I agree that in some cases, some of the old pieces are better than most of what you can get today. I used a Slant sig bari for years, all the time trying to find modern pieces a s good or better. Then I found out it was possible top make an exact copy of it that plays exactly the same, so there is no need to buy vintage pieces, except for the nostalgia/collectors value. One day I will bring out a production model of that copy, but I 'm sure many people will think it's somehow different to the original from which it is cast.
I would probably be one of the first in line to buy one of those mouthpieces when they come out - as long as they haven't been 'improved upon' in any way.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I would probably be one of the first in line to buy one of those mouthpieces when they come out - as long as they haven't been 'improved upon' in any way.
No, they wouldn't be. The current PPT baritone is an improvement on a slant, but if brought out a copy Slant, that's exactly what it would be like.
 
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