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This may be a weird question, but when I practise in my practice room, the sound seems dull and spread compared to other locales. It's a smaller room, with very little in it. Walls are all bare, not much furniture.

I'm wondering if shelves, etc might help to stop the sound from 'bouncing off the walls,' as they say, or will that room always sound poor?

Anyone have an acoustically perfect room, and like to share some ideas?
 

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I practice in a closet for a barebones sound with no BS. It's good for hearing your pitch center and enveness of tone through the whole scale. When I play "musical" pieces I use my living room with high ceilings and non-parallel walls for a warm sympathetic sound.
 

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Plenty of good air flow. I like humidity around 40% to 50% range. Sea level preferred. If the room has a door, open it if you can without bothering others. You have to let the sound pressure out. If the room is really dead sounding, play into a mic with a nice verb and wear headphones. It's much cheeper then building Capitol studio A.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Shelves are good, especially if loaded with different size books. This helps to diffuse and "scatter" sound rather than purely reflecting it back like a hard wall, or muting upper frequencies like foam.

I use a combination of diffusion and HF damping to get the sound close to what I like. You are unlikely to get perfection without very expensive acoustic treatment and specialist knowledge, but it's possible with trial and error to get something decent.

If the room is too bright, then some HF damping can be done with foam, rockwool panels or to a lesser extent just hanging curtains, duvet or soft furnishings. But don't overdo it or the room will be too "dead" and not be pleasant to play in, hence using the diffusion (shelving) to deal with some of issues.
 

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Sounds to me like you are missing some of the delayed multipath reflection (reverb) of a larger room. This is a function of the size and you are not going to be able to change that much. If you have parallel walls, you might find that certain notes tend to "boom", which has to do with the resonant frequency of the space. One thing that I sometimes do is to play into a mic and run everything through a mixer and add reverb to taste, wearing headphones. That might add a bit of wetness and make your sound more pleasant to you. It also can give you a bit of distance from your own sound, like a dancer practicing in a mirror, and give you a bit more objective perspective on your own playing.
 
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