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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am using an unknown, non-branded brass 2 screws ligature. It performs and fits well to my MC Gregory 4 16. I tried Selmer Soloist ligature on my Gregory, and the sound is brighter - so I don't like it.

What's your experience? ;)
 

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I also use a non-branded two screw ligature...and I Like it.
 

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Mine has the original ligature, (2 screws) and cap, which looks like it had been silver plate which is mostly worn off now. It's ugly, but I like it. The ligature has an "A" stamped in the top, I'm not sure if this is a brand, size, alto? or what. My mouthpiece has some teeth gouges in the bite plate area but this does not effect the playability or sound at all.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Scott C said:
Mine has the original ligature, (2 screws) and cap, which looks like it had been silver plate which is mostly worn off now. It's ugly, but I like it. The ligature has an "A" stamped in the top, I'm not sure if this is a brand, size, alto? or what. My mouthpiece has some teeth gouges in the bite plate area but this does not effect the playability or sound at all.

Scott
Scott, I have the same silver ligature - with capital letter "A" stamped on it and has 2 screws. The knobs of the screws are thin/flat and quite big. I think it was made in France. No brand. It plays good on my Gregory mouthpiece but I prefer a non-branded metal ligature with 2 screws came with an old hard rubber bilhart. It gives a warmer tone and is very responsive.
 

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I've tried a Woodstone Ishimori lig.,a Bonade and a stock Meyer lig. in addition to the original ligature. The original just fits it like a glove, although it's got some wear and takes a little care in getting it to hold the reed just right, but once you do get it positioned right, it's still my first choice followed by the Woodstone Ishimori which is a "reversed" lig. a very well made ligature,(has the screws on top) and positioning "shims"? to hold the reeds firmly against the face of the MP. The Ishimori works well on my Meyer G which also gives a nice dark tone, Desmond-like, but is more difficult to play softly and is not as easy overall to articulate. I think those old Model A M.C. Gregory's are the ticket for alto.

I think Desmond just used a stock metal ligature and I don't think he was too caught up in equipment. One thing I've noticed about his style is that didn't seem to hold on to notes for very long, also he seemed to favor the upper register, he could really sing up there! His style of playing is very much player dependant, he had a great natural understanding of swing and West coast style and if you've ever heard much of Lee Konitz, Desmond really seemed to follow that style of playing. He's one of my all time favorites.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Scott,

Yes, Desmond is my all time favorite as well. He is awesome on the swing, high notes, improvization......So, are you playing on a SBA alto? Regarding the original ligature, it was given to me as a gift from my mouthpiece tech who cut the metal bridging the 2 screws with the aim to allow the reed vibrates more freely. The result is good.

Regarding the mouthpiece, I have tried big chamber Gregory Model A ie 20 which is too diffuse and less powerful. I am playing on a 16, and want to try out a 18.
 

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ppamhk:

I wish I had an SBA. I inherited a 1929 Conn New Wonder Series II alto in silver plate with the gold wash bell from a relative that passed away recently. He was married to a woman from Mazatlan, Mexico named Josephine. When my father visited her in Long Beach, CA recently, as he is completing a family history document, she had an old photo probably taken in the late 1930's of William playing this old horn with his buddies. I'll attach a copy of the photo to this thread because it's so cool! Anyway, she asked my father if anyone in our family played sax, and he mentioned that I sort of played a little. She gave him the horn without hesitation, it had not been touched in over 50 years and still has the original pads. When I took it to my instructor, he slapped his Meyer on it and played Take 5, my jaw dropped, as he sounded so much like Desmond I could not believe it. He has one of those $4000.00 Keilworth Shadow? and I think, (and he would agree also) that my old Conn sounded much better. I quickly learned that it's not so much the equipment as it is your ability level. My instructor is a degreed professional saxophonist. The keys are somewhat challenging on this old horn but it will not be impossible to overcome this and the tone is really nice, I am a true believer in the older Conn's, New Wonder Series II, (some call them Chu's) and the 6M series, if you can get one in good condition. I think they rival the Selmer SBA and Mark VI, although those horns are special too.


I'll try to attach that photo tomorrow, Chow for now
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Scott,

History of your Conn is impressive. More importantly, it sounds great. Congratulations on having such as good horn. I agree that the player, rather than the horn, dictates the tone.

I haven't played any Conns before. I would love to try one if there is a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Vintage horn with lot of happiness

Very nice photo, thanks Scott. It is a treasure to have inherited a horn that brought lot of cheers and happiness to the owner.

My horns are all vintage but I don't know their history :dontknow:
 
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