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I would like to repad a Conn 1924 Wonder tenor saxophone. I am a classical clarinetist, but sometimes double in shows, big bands. The conn I wish to repad has very old pads, some might even be original-it surprisingly plays quite good, love the tone- quite "old" sound, dark, resonant, BIG.
I have repadded clarinets, never saxes. There are so many different pads, resonators, I have no idea what to get. Like I said, I love the way the horn sounds now, vintage sound is great, not looking in anyway to "modernize" the tone(well maybe a little). Any suggestions which pads and resonators to get would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I recently had my newly-acquired Conn NWII (1927) soprano done with standard tan leather pads and metal slightly-domed resonators with rivets in the center. Sure, not a tenor, but a Conn and I think the principles are similar. Mine turned out perfectly - plays like a dream. I can't defend my choice, though. The guy who did the job gave me choices, and that's what I decided upon.

I don't think it all matters much as long as you use resonators of some type. I once played an old Conn alto re-padded without resonators and it was pretty tame - stuffy may be a better description. But I can only guess that it was the absence of resonators.

I wouldn't fret too much about it . . . I think the seal achieved on the tone holes is more important than what pad and resonator is chosen. DAVE
 

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I think I would use conn style pads and flat resos like they came with ...well, at least later. Its possible the 24 just had rivits...

What does it have now?

Im not a tech at all but I know guys who have had horns made for flat resonators who say they had intonation issues with domes.

...might be hogwash but then again???
 

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Old conns / bueschers, I like to just use a single rivet in the pads, retains that vintage look but allows modern pads to be fitted.

Stripping down an old conn tomoz in fact for repadding, it will have black leather pads and si glue rivets.

Steve
 

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What Dave said.

Considering they probably came without resos and people have put every type of resonator in there, you probably have some latitude. I presently have a '24 Conn C-mel, a '29 NWII alto and a '29 NWII tenor. All three have flat metal resos.

The '24 C-mel has largish flat sterling resonators on Conn Reso-pads. The alto has average sized flat s.s. resonators with normal good quality pads and the tenor has fairly healthy silver plated resos with kangaroo pads. They all have a big, warm, robust sound.

I recently played a Martin Comm III tenor with no resonators and it had a wonderful, big tone (I played it in a parking lot out of the back of the seller's pickup truck:). The one I bought later that night has metal domed resonators. It sounds great too.

If you like the sound the way it is you might want to stick with smaller resonators. But you'll do no wrong either way as far as I can tell from my horns.
 

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What Dave said.

Considering they probably came without resos and people have put every type of resonator in there, you probably have some latitude. I presently have a '24 Conn C-mel, a '29 NWII alto and a '29 NWII tenor. All three have flat metal resos.

The '24 C-mel has largish flat sterling resonators on Conn Reso-pads. The alto has average sized flat s.s. resonators with normal good quality pads and the tenor has fairly healthy silver plated resos with kangaroo pads. They all have a big, warm, robust sound.

I recently played a Martin Comm III tenor with no resonators and it had a wonderful, big tone (I played it in a parking lot out of the back of the seller's pickup truck:). The one I bought later that night has metal domed resonators. It sounds great too.

If you like the sound the way it is you might want to stick with smaller resonators. But you'll do no wrong either way as far as I can tell from my horns.
Personally I would either use flat metal or domed plastic boosters. These are the most common variety of pads and pretty much every shop will have them on hand, so a pad replacement can happen right now.

Although for emotional reasons I like all the pads in my horn to match, I believe it almost certainly doesn't actually make any difference.

I have 3 Conn saxophones: one with plastic slightly domed boosters; one with flat metal, and one with Hollywood boosters. Of course because they are alto, tenor, and baritone they sound different, but to me they all have that characteristic Conn sound.
 
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