Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The small pad on the upper octave key arm fell out. Can I just glue it back in? What kind of glue should be used?
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
It should be a hot melt glue.
For techs often stick shellac.
Another is higher-temp "glue-gun" glue. (Lower temp can soften in a warm car.)

For band-aid work, all manner of stuff has been used, eg chewing gum, Bluetac, superglue gel, etc. Even wrapping with cling-film!
Best not to use low-viscosity superglue because it can get everywhere and do serious damage to lacquer.

But be aware that the appropriate effective thickness (including the glue) of this pad is one of the many parameters that contributes to the proper function of the octave mechanism.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
4,901 Posts
Mind you if the glue failed on this pad, it is probably soon to fail on any pad installed from the same overhaul. It's best to have the horn looked over by a tech. If this was a fluke accident, invest in a cigar blow torch that runs on butane, and some stick shellac. You can purchase the latter from musicmedic.com. The stuff is worth it's weight in gold when you need it.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,432 Posts
Just use contact cement on it. I like Super glue for a lot of things on a sax but not pads since it will make a heckuva mess when the pad has to be removed later, forcing the tech to scrape out the whole back of the pad that is stuck to the cup. Plus, SG gives off toxic vapors when heated, which is exactly what the unsuspecting tech would do to remove the pad, thinking it is secured with shellac or hot glue.
On second thought, since most any octave pad is going to be to some degree off-center, it may not be feasible to get it re-glued in exactly the same way it was in before, resulting in a leak. If you can't replace it the right way yourself, take it to the shop - its a very inexpensive repair.
The 'right way' is to take the octave rocker off, remove the old pad, scrape/clean out the pad cup, install the replacement pad with the correct adhesive, replace the rocker (oiling the hinge in the process) and adjust the octave system as needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
You might take the key off and see how much shellac is in the key cup. You can already see how much is on the back of the pad. If there is a sufficient amount you can simply heat the key cup and reinsert the pad pressing it down into the cup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,031 Posts
You might take the key off and see how much shellac is in the key cup. You can already see how much is on the back of the pad. If there is a sufficient amount you can simply heat the key cup and reinsert the pad pressing it down into the cup.
Best answer. It doesn’t have to be flaming red hot to melt it right back in
Get something other than your finger to press the key down unless you like the smell of burning flesh.
Since I haven’t ever owned a new horn who knows what kind of cheapie glue they use now.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
If the previous installer used anything other than a hot melt glue - that includes shellac - then reheating will not do the job.
(This is a major reason why hot-melt is the standard.)
Contact glue, although used by some dodgy manufacturers, is IMO totally inappropriate.

And as others have said, when you put the pad back the alignment may be different, creating a leak.
This is why a technician would replace the pad. Small ones are cheap. Followed of course by adjustment of the octave mechanism.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,939 Posts
If the previous installer used anything other than a hot melt glue - that includes shellac - then reheating will not do the job.
(This is a major reason why hot-melt is the standard.)
“Hot melt” also includes those glue guns used for arts and crafts. The glue from those guns is not reworkable.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
“Hot melt” also includes those glue guns used for arts and crafts. The glue from those guns is not reworkable.
In my experience - I've used them for other purposes - They soften with heat, and re-"harden" when cool, therefore reworkable - "thermoplastic". It's just that they do it at a lower temperature, not really appropriate for woodwind.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top